"I am hungry."

Translation:Io ho fame.

December 29, 2012

54 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmangie86

Why isn't it "Sono fame"? "Ho fame" would be I have hunger...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KalebP15

It's the same in Spanish, instead of saying "soy hombre" (I am hungry), you say "tengo hambre" (I have hunger) it's just how the language is spoken and how it will always be spoken. Sorry this probably didn't help at all


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LauraLami

"Soy hombre" means "I'm man" you meant to write "soy hAmbre"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IgorHenriqueA

In portuguese we can do both "Estou com fome" (I am with hunger) and "Tenho fome" (I have hunger) maybe Spanish and Italian accept the verb "to be" as an alternate form


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SebastianB233791

That goes for Spanish too, estoy con hambre.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burgos69

Ho fame is more similar to French: j'ai faim Because in Spanich we are not using Haber but instead Tener.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoronaBorealis

thanks, that does help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josh.pisci

Fame doesn't take essere, which would be sono if it did, it takes avere, which makes it Ho. Ho also doesn't always mean have, look up the changing of avere to all the different forms (such as I, you, he/she/it, noi, voi, loro)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

It's also the same in French j'ai fame not je suis fame. It's because in these languages the literal translation is "hunger", i.e. the word is a noun, whereas in English we use an adjective (hungry) - so you "are" and adjective and you "have" a noun.

Neither is right or wrong, they just reflect a different way of looking at the world.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MirellaBru4

In italian you say "io sono affamato" or "io ho fame" (the first one is not accepted,why?)but you'll never say "sono fame". "Fame" is a noum like hunger in english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ManarAsim

Actually sono is "am" and "ho" means have


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M0nicaT

You would also you use i have when you are on about whether you are feeling hot and cold


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azraeleternity

My question would be if it isn't supposed to be "sono" why is it listed when you click on "I am"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dolcesweet

Same question of mine. Why I am hungry is "Ho fame" not "Sono fame"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4pp3ls4p

Language isn't translating words 1:1. in many languages you say "I have hunger" and not "I am hungry" in fact we used to do this in english too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aballerin

You can also say in spanish "Estoy con hambre " but the most common is "Tengo hambre" as in italian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dry_County

Duolingo did not accept the translation "Sono affamatA". Was corrected in "Sono affamatO".. Why? It's not the same thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/travel.linguist

At least you should prefer saying: Ho fame. -> affamato rather means "starving".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariangelaCC

I think Beatles-Musician is right about affamato meaning "starving". But so you know "sono affamatA" is grammatically correct if you are a woman, for men it would be "sono affamatO".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DocKuro

I used "sono affamato" but the translation wasn't accepted anyway. I can say the translation is correct though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Annabel257400

The two sentances they gave me befor it was "i eat the ice" "the taste is not sweet" and then they give me this. I eat the ice. The taste is not sweet. I am hungry. XDDDDDDD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtnHrng

Why is it not "Sono affamato?", it is even a suggestion – maybe a bug?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertoAmbro

Esatto, la traduzione più aderente alla frase è "Io sono affamato".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniele728192

Perché non io sono affamato?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreaBlackDrake

Why "sono affamato" is not right? In another sentence I translated "E' affamato" and it was right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chyaarisan

Then why does DL show the translation of 'hungry' as BRAMOSO?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maxiimumr

I don't know. But i haven't hear from Italian people the word "Bramoso". :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniele728192

It means i have a strong Wish, not i am hungry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itsneuza

it's like in portuguese. we say "tenho fome" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sxrvah_

And in spanish we say "Tengo hambre"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maximus135-_-

how is this a flirt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NjAlshoka

SO TO BE HUNGRY IS = TO HAVE A HUNGRY AND WE CAN SAY ( HO FAME ) OR ( IO HO FAME ) BOTH ARE CORRECT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreaRens

"Ho fame" means "i have hunger" "La fame" means "the hunger"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caduzera

Why "ha fame" is wrong? Ho and Ha not mean 'have'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennaHO

Ho fame = I am hungry Ha fame = he/she/it is hungry. They both mean 'have,' but they are both different conjugations. Ho is I have, Ha is he/she/it has, Hai is you have, Hanno is they have, Avete is you (all) have, and Abbiamo is we have. If you are just beginning, the next time you have to translate from English to Italian, hover over the verb and it should give you a word with a big C by it. Click on it. It will give you the conjugation of the verb. They almost always end the same; -o, -i, -no, -te, -iamo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caduzera

Grazie JennaHO, thanks for your explanation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennaHO

No problem! =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pennantao

Ho is 'I have' Ha is 's/he have'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rdwibowo

why there are no famo famino fame etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aforgione

When I usually say I'm hungry in Italian, I say "cio fame." Could that just be my dialect or is it still wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BronzetheSling

Ho il fame è correto, vero?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertoAmbro

No, la traduzione può essere "ho fame" oppure "sono affamato".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Olly214661

Previous question asked to translate "Io ho fame" which I answered correctly in english "I am hungry". Very next question asked the reverse to translate "I am hungry" and was failed for "Io ho fame". Both are technically correct I should not have been failed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthias921868

Is it really wrong to say 'Io ho fame' instead of 'ho fame'? The question before it corrected me because I wasn't formal enough, using don't instead of do not, and now I'm too formal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IreneSalo1

I said "Io fame", isn't "ho" have/has so why is it used here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariangelaCC

In Italian, the way to say "I am hungry" could be literally translated to "I have hunger" > "Io ho fame". The subject, "io", can be omitted, but the verb "avere" ("ho" for the 1st person) cannot. Your sentence is missing the verb, so it makes no sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TonyHoward2

So when you tap on the 3 dots below the words to get a reminder...it doesnt give you the correct information. Whats the point.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carol399106

Why is it not. Io sono fame?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christine746226

I said "io sono fame" which makes sense to me why is it wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AzfarAzman

Supposedly answer Io sono fame or Sono fame.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertoAmbro

"Sono affamato" dovrebbe essere considerato corretto.

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