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"You have taken too much."

Translation:Has tomado demasiado.

5 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
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Apparently just 'mucho' alone now means 'too much' ! Grrr!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goodwilhealthy

Mexicans don't use coger... this should be mentioned... Has a sexual connotation

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alejandrocarmo

But, has tomado demasiado, also could be... you have drunk too much. In Mexico

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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i assume that this is the case in other american countries too... any native speakers here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alejandrocarmo

Not in Spain

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LingPenguin
LingPenguin
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I tried "tanto", but one of the correct answers was "mucho". I realise that demasiado seems to be the best choice, but surely tanto would be a better choice than mucho?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caiser
caiser
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You need a comparative sentence to use "tanto".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LingPenguin
LingPenguin
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Alright, thanks. I'll keep that in mind.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lowryderkid

Also, you can just leave it with an ellipsis at the end. "Hoy he comido tanto..." Or in an exclamation/question. ¡Me duele tanto! ¿Te duele tanto?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerlucas13

But then it's not necessarily a comparative: "It hurts me as much!" Huh?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

I used "llevado" which has more meanings, correct? Can you comment on that usage? It seems to avoid all the risks and why should we assume this applies to drink or drugs? This easily could just mean that someone is selfish and takes too much, or has taken too much change, or is carrying too much at once even? Can you help with the meanings of "llevado"? It would seem it should be a preference since you imply (I think) that "tomado" can have rude meanings? It would not be useful to learn a rude verb.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Llevar has a different meaning of "to take". It's more "to accompany", taking something to somewhere.

Tomar is the "selfish" kind of taking, i.e. change of ownership. Compare these:

  • Tomo a tu perro. - I am taking your dog. (He's mine now.)
  • Llevo a tu perro al parque. - I am taking your dog to the park.

Using tomar is not rude here. Tomar can mean "to drink", given the proper context, but it refers mainly to non-alcoholic drinks. Beber would refer to drinking alcohol here.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LobsangC
LobsangCPlus
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Thank you. Tanto mejor con quatro.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ToddBaxter

Why can't I say "Has tomado demasiado mucho"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jerrymack

that would be redundant because demasiado means too much

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lila_tentakel

Awesome translation errors here: has tomado demasiado means that you drank too much, has cogido demasiado sounds very rude in South America

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caiser
caiser
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Tomar not only means to drink. It means coger too. Furthermore, in this sentence it means drinking only in very specific situations, for example if you've drunk too much of a drug.

If you want to say that a person is drunk because he has drunk too much you will never say "ha tomado demasiado" you will say "ha bebido demasiado"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clippered

Can you say "muy mucho"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Technically you can, but using those two words like that is very rare nowadays.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Muy mucho sounds like a gringo trying to be funny. Like a teenager in Spanish class! Alezzzix, can we use bastante here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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I think that would translate to enough, but some people use it as a synonymous for mucho.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chesterx

usted ha tomado demasiodo was accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisBrown505906

So I just tried this myself and it wasn't accepted... Can anybody explain why it has to be 'Has' in this case?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ilene-in-DP

Can someone explain to me when to use tomando and when to use llevando?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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If you just want to say "Take [something]" use "Tomar." If you want the additional meaning "Take [something somewhere]" then use "Llevar."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jerrymack

I thought has tenido meant you have taken.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerlucas13

"has tenido" = "you have had"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kayhard

Tenido from tener. Tomado from tomar

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J9Z
J9Z
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Would "Has llevado tan mucho" work??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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If you drop the «tan» and put a «te» in it then it would make sense: te has llevado mucho

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdK4kY

I tried "te has llevado demasiado" but Duo said no and suggested "tú has llevado demasiado". I thought llevarse would be valid here, with the connotation of "taking away" - no?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Llevarse has a taking something from somebody connotation, generally in a violent way or without being noticed, I'd say it's a valid translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdK4kY

"Do you have any tomato purée?" would have been my uneducated guess. Thanks Duo!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KathleenWa588826

Why cant i say bastante ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kyle420196
Kyle420196
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Me pregunto por que no se puede decir 'has sacado demasiado' ... No hay nada en el contexto que nos obliga usar 'tomar' aqui, verdad?

1 year ago