"A mulher veste uma bota."

Translation:The woman wears a boot.

6 years ago

65 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/FLara
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The correct verb is "calça", not "veste". "vestir" is used for clothes, and "calçar" is used for shoes.

There's a little word play in Brazil: "Se calça a bota, mas se bota a calça".

I don't know if "veste" is wrong here, but "calça" is much more used.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vivisaurus
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That is true, you're totally right. Because, if all of this wasn't confusing enough, "bota" also means "put". But is it completely wrong to "vestir" the bota? I guess I have never used "vestir a bota", or "veste o sapato" for that matter.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Augusto_Derlian

It's wrong to say: "vestir" with "sapato" or " bota". I'm brazilian. Use "pôr" or "calçar".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andregs
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It is not wrong. Remember Brazil is huge, some cities in São Paulo and Minas Gerais do accept "vestir" for boots and shoes, but "pôr" and "calçar" surely are more common.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neia.Abreu
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Veste = roupas; calça ou põe = sapatos ! Calçar = eu- calço; tu-calças; ele/ela/você- calça; nós -calçamos; vós -calçáveis; eles/elas / vocês- calçam.
Pôr= eu ponho; tu pões; ele põe; nós pomos; vós pondes;eles põem

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

andregs, we have to pay attention to the accents, so "por" (without accent) is a preposition. The verb "pôr" has the accent.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andregs
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You're totally right. I fixed it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
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I'm confused, what does "Se calça a bota, mas se bota a calça." mean?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vivisaurus
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Literally, it means "one puts on the boot, but one puts on the pants." But it is a word play that to Brazilians sounds more like "one pants the boot, but one boots the pant". This is why:

Calçar = verb, to "put on", used for shoes.
Botar = verb, to put. Informal word that means the same as "colocar".

Calça(s) = pants
Bota = boot

Opposites, see. That's why it is a word play. =) I hope that helps clear things up!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
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Ah, it's somewhat like how we park on driveways and drive on parkways. :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chevere12345

And your nose is running, and your feet smell. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vivisaurus
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Exactly!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pfeil
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Well... talking about real scenarios, let's put it in present continuous:

A mulher está calçando uma bota = The woman is putting on boots
A mulher está vestindo uma bota = The woman is putting on/wearing boots

Vestir can mean either to put on or to wear, whereas - in my view as a native speaker - calçar is preferred for the former (only for footwear!) but a bit weird for the latter. I would like other lusophones to express their point of view.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/egespindola
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Hello "pfeil".

In Brazil, is more commonly to say Calçar for footwear and vestir for clothes. In this case, the sentence would be like this: A mulher está calçando a bota. The sentence isn't wrong, but it's more commonly in these kind of cases to use calçar.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pfeil
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I'm a brazilian too. What I wanted to say is: in the sense of to wear, vestir is more common than calçar, even for footwear. But I've got your opinion, so till now we have a tie at 1-1 ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

I think "usar" would solve all difficulties ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tuuliviiri

Why does the woman wear only one boot? Where is the other one?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SariahLily
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She broke her ankle and the other boot won't fit over her cast. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SariahLily
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Meh. Reading further down, apparently it is an idiosyncrasy of Portuguese and actually implies the pair. That is good to know. Wish they would explain that in the lesson somehow.

Edit: It does accept "The woman wears boots" :) It should show that as an optional correct answer, though, so we know it can refer to a pair.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dykemanb
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The translation can also be puts on a boot (though they didn't allow that answer) - that makes it a more natural sentence.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew_H

Correct me if I am wrong, but: vester=put on & usar=wear

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vivisaurus
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Vestir=put on and wear

Usar is also commonly used as "wear", you're right.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SariahLily
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They allow it now. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Promethea.Manos

The dress code at Duolingo's offices is really bizarre. People go around wearing capes, only one boot... or bee costumes when they read the newspaper.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sambadojazz

Hahaha!!! And lets not even mention the people who talk to sharks and the women who show us their blue spoons!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaoriocha
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I don't think "put on" and "wear" means the same. "Put on" means that she is still doing the action, "wear" means she has already 'put on' and the boot is already on her body (legs, feet, or head,...). What wonders me is whether 'boots' and 'boot' mean the same in Portugese?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vivisaurus
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The verb "vestir" means both in Portuguese, and this sentence could mean either. But "botas" is the plural form of "bota". They either mean that she "puts on a boot", or that she "wears a boot".

*edit: FLara has a good point, that you "calça a bota" because it is a shoe.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spike0912

Yeah, I agree with kitzi! It is gramatically correct, but when we learn a foreign language it must be practical...

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RajOberon

I thought "puts on" was also an acceptable translation for "veste"

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vivisaurus
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It should be! Unless they are looking for "calçar" because it is a shoe.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/compotrigo
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The multiple option is wrong "vestir/visto/vestir". The correct option "veste" is missing.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
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Report that!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melesana

this is far from the first time the "correct" answer doesn't make sense. they never promised us a rose garden. :) it's beta.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DingoELGringo

It is getting beta and beta!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gpjt

got "translate this to English" before I'd been introduced to "veste" or "bota". I've had quite a few of these recently, am now running Google Translate side-by-side...

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rbhays

you can just hover your mouse pointer over the words and the translation will pop up!

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gpjt

You're right! I hadn't realised that it did that for non-new words.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emmmo74

Ok guys, i am really a beginner and still doesn't get it. "Veste uma bota" really means one boot?? Just because there languages where it actually would mean a "pair of boot" (in Hungarian for example we never use plural for that) in Portuguese is this not the case?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

In this case it means a pair of boots. If you say "Eu comprei um sapato" you mean "I bought a pair of shoes". Sometimes it is used in plural "Estou usando sapatos novos" and still refering to the pair of shoes you are wearing. Maybe there is some confusion here with the word "uma". It can be the feminine number one as well as the feminine indefinite article a/an. In the DL sentence it should be an indefinite article and that's why the given translation is "The woman wears a boot" and not "The woman wears one boot". Few messages above I wrote about how we deal with the ambiguities (using "par" and "pé" to make it clearer).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emmmo74

Thank you! though it is still confusing that Portuguese sometimes use plural, sometimes not for the "pair of". in my language wearing shoes in plural would mean you tried to squeeze more shoes onto your feet, English also consistent in this on the other way around... anyway i will try to live with this:)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

Actually, good Portuguese demands plural for "par de..." In spoken language we kind of forget that, sometimes ;-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kitzi

"wears" a boot doesn´t make any sense to me.. should be "wears boots" in my opinion

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Prancytime

Well, it says she's only wearing one. Maybe it's that giant boot from Mario.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maria_ferro

Or maybe she has one leg? :)

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindseykgibb

It doesn't say WHERE she's wearing it. Could be on her head? :)

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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In Portuguese it is common to say "eu comprei um sapato novo", using singular rather than plural. Every language has its idiosyncrasies!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

You are totally right, emeyr! "A mulher calça uma bota" doesn't mean only that is one of the pair, although may be some ambiguity (by the way, you say "um pé" to refer to each of the pair of shoes, boots, etc = Eu achei um pé de sapato embaixo da cama mas não sei onde está o outro pé). Anyone in Brazil will understand this sentence as the woman is putting both boots on. But the best verb to use in this case is "calçar". You should use "calçar" for socks and it can be used for gloves too. A substitute for "calçar" and "vestir", if you are not sure, is verb "pôr" (a tricky conjugation, though). "Você pode pôr os sapatos, as roupas, as meias e as luvas e ninguém vai achar esquisito". ;-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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"Pé de sapato" - I never heard that expression. Would you say: " Eu comprei um pé de sapatos novo(s) semana passada"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoMai1

If you mean to buy only one shoe and not a pair, yes I would (singular, never plural). Quite unlikely... :-) About the use of "pé" for shoes, think that a pair of shoes is made of two pieces, one for the right foot and other for the left. So, "um par de sapatos tem um pé direito e um pé esquerdo". If you say "tem um sapato debaixo da minha cama" you may be talking about one only shoe or a pair of shoes (context would help). Without context, saying "um pé de sapato" or "um par de sapatos" eliminate any ambiguity. If you are to say how many shoes you have, a good choice is count them by pairs to avoid ambiguity.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria696768
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Emeyr Sou portuguesa ensinei portugues e é a primeira vez que oiço essa expressão. A explicação do (creio adriano) está correcta excepto neste ponto: Pé DO Sapato.Como ele referiu há o pé direito e esquerdo que entram dentro do respectivo sapato e quando se encontra um sapato esquerdo ou direito, diz-se :eu encontrei um pé...Do sapato(par).Assim como é absolutamente incorrecto dizer-se - eu comprei Um sapato novo- Diz-se: Comprei sapatos (um par) ou se é mais especìfico comprei um ou dois pares de sapatos.Sempre que implica par é plural Isto no port pt

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulina.QC

veste UMA bota , means that she is wearing only one boot or that she is wearing boots?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djeidot
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only one boot in this case. I know, it doesn't make sense.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SariahLily
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It means the pair. It's an idiosyncracy of Portuguese.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/villegas889

i think is good

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moolybdenum

indeed it is good.

i see effort to fix glitches and mistakes. and this forum provides excellent clarification.

thank you all.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mareli0

She wears one boot? Mhm...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pietvo
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Maybe she lost the other boot. Or she was confused and put a boot on one foot and a shoe on the other one.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moomra
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And now I'm confused with translation of 'a mulher' it used to be woman in previous lessons and here the app has corrected me to lady, saying that woman in this case is a mistake. Explanation anybody?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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"Woman" is preferable to "lady" which involves judgement. Report it to "Ker" - she is quite responsive to corrections.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moomra
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Thanks! Should I go over the exercise again to be able to report it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
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It's always helpful to repeat. Sometimes it takes Ker a while to respond, but a week ago I received about a dozen emails from her accepting my corrections to the English translations that I had sent over time.. I make a point to explain why the changes are needed.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barbaratorrance

no one wears A boot,two are more pratical

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SariahLily
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If you only have one foot you might, or a cast on one. But it turns out it actually implies a pair.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moolybdenum

So why did it say im wrong saying "woman" instead of "lady"?

I saw you guys breifly mention this....

How do i know when to us "lady", & is "mulher" the word used for "lady"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vivisaurus
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Lady is closer to dama or moça.

4 years ago
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