"Er de fattige?"

Translation:Are they poor?

July 11, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FranklinPa666142

Is this related to the English word fatigue?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattHaythem

I'd guess not. The "-gue" in "fatigue" tells me it comes from French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NorwayLover

Yep, same word in French, it's the word created out of the adjective tired ( don't really know how to explain it )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 192

According to Wiktionary, 'fattig' (and 'fåtøk' in Nynorsk) stems from Old Norse: fátœkr. There's no apparent link between that and 'fatigue', but it could be a possibility.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonikaS777

I thought the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexKarampas

"Er du vs. er de" this sounds like a pain to make out....Is it that bad as I suspect it to be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 192

You should just learn the difference by listening to them a few times, then you should easily be able to recognize their differences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexKarampas

I can do that now, after 2 years :) Granted the difference is really small, but discernible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orayliya

This is just a particularly bad audio example tbh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frenger5

I have some trouble pronouncing "fattige". Is the 'ge' silent?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexKarampas

It makes a small "j" sound I think. Really short. You could also treat it as a silent letter, a lax tongue transition from i to e will produce the same sound.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 192

The 'g' is silent in Eastern Norwegian, but the 'e' isn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/svenska1227

Nei, men det er jeg.

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