"Tu tens um agasalho?"

Translation:Do you have a coat?

6 years ago

38 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/davidalso
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"Agasalho" can be any warm top, e.g., a coat, a sweater, a hoodie, a poncho. There is no direct translation, so it's surprising that they're using it this way. But you can expect your grandmother to make sure you have one.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaminroe

My grandmother always said casaco... so annoying lol

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annekarakash

What is the difference between agasalho and casaco?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ryshenpoelar

Drawing on davidalso's post, I guess a "casaco" is a more specified term for a coat whilst an "agasalho" - as can be seen in his very nice post - is not. Also, but this is nothing more than imagination gone loose, the former ressembles a bit the British "Cossack". Which, for the sake of better retention, might be perceived as alluding to those Russians who may very well have had to wrap themselves up quite well.. :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/legatrix
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It is 'Portuguese' - a language name is often not in one-to-one agreement with where it is spoken, cf. 'English' in Australia and the US. Also, from a practical point of view, Brazilian Portuguese is probably going to be more useful to learn (hugely larger economy, population, etc). I therefore see nothing wrong with learning Brazilian vocabulary, even if you want the European Portuguese vocabulary as a base. This is unless you had some special reason to only learn European Portuguese (a Portuguese girlfriend, for example).

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2dghi6
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truth

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielTietz

tu tens um agasalho = você tem um agasalho ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindseykgibb

Agasalho vs casaco? Is it like the difference between "coat" and "jacket"? When would you use one word over the other?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kitsune1977
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I think "agasalho"(or "abrigo")is a school jacket or a sweater, "casaco" is coat and jacket is "jaqueta"(as in motorcycle jacket). You can use only "casaco" if you want, it is more common and we always understand.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danmoller
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Agasalho is any kind of warm clothing. It's very hard to translate it exactly to English when it's singular, but the plural agasalhos could very nicely be translated as "warm/winter clothes".

Casaco is specifically "coat".

"Abrigo" is not common at all in Brazil, I have only seen this when buying trekking/camping equipment.

Often, the word "abrigo" means only "shelter/camp". This is common.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melesana

I don't think it's necessarily only a coat - I think it can be any warm clothing.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neurasthenia

"Agasalho" might have an equivalent in the term our elderly teachers used to use, they would say "It's cold, wear your wrap."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipStanley
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Thank you, mondlichtnd, margotpingu, and frencesca, for the most informative, encouraging and inspiring contribution to this discussion. and I must include legatrix. I am motivated to go on.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rastatopoulos

Do you always pronunce "LHO" like this, or is it juste for the word agasalho ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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actually not!! it's a complicated phonic, but not like that: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tkFtyBDdc8

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amanda949961

Oi quem quiser eu sei falar português sertinho e some adisonar no amigos que eu ensino tudo tchau

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kitsune1977
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oi, amanda, você realmente escreve bem mas precisa dar uma melhorada..."certinho", "...é só me adicionar...", ao invés de começar "ensinando", tente estudar junto com alguém primeiro... notei que você escreve muito "serto", o correto é "certo", com "c". quando escrevemos com "s" estamos sendo irônicos, quer dizer que a pessoa se acha certa mas na verdade está errada, entende? bons estudos!!

ah, e evite usar os atalhos...você perde muito com isso.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ps42311p

Slang English... but it's important to note that sometimes we'll say (quickly): "You got a sweater?" It's 'improper' but commonly used. You shouldn't speak like that but it's important to know. =D

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ps42311p

You 'got' = You 'have' . But this is not proper... ;)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/richarry

"Sounds like "two teams umargazvarlue" . Is it the computer voice or is it closer to the correct pronunciation and I am still not attuned?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scutigera

The beginning does sound like "Tu tens" to me as I know that is the Portuguese and I am expecting it; but the rest does sound like "uma gasalho" =]

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ghassanmax
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What is the difference between "ten/s" and tem?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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Você, ele, ela tem = you, he, she have/has

Tu tens = you have

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/S.Hathaway

Ok, so my question is this: is there a significant difference between 'Do you have a coat?' and 'You have a coat?'. I guess the first is more clearly a question, but with punctuation/intonation to indicate that the second is also a question, is there a substantive difference? But also, is there a way that--apart from how it translates into English--there's a difference to native Portuguese speakers?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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No, it is the same way in Portuguese. You only change your intonation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scutigera

For the English part of your question, when relying solely on intonation it becomes an "echo" question, which can show surprise (for which no answer may be sought) or be seeking clarification but pretty much requires a previous interaction for context and that does not work in all cases of questioning.

https://www.thoughtco.com/echo-question-language-1690627

Another is kind of sloppy English by just dropping the structure that creates a question (and mostly only allows for limited answers):

https://www.thoughtco.com/direct-question-grammar-1690460

*Caution
A questioning tone of voice can turn a statement into a yes-no question. Such questions have the structure of a declarative sentence. The tone of voice has become particularly common, especially among young people, in recent decades.

But, most of all, is that intonation is not easily recognized by computers (especially since DL does not penalize based on basic punctuation and really only sees the accents... and sometimes the possessives).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AvoBoi
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I translated "Do you have a warm clothing" since that's what i learned it means on tinycards, but it gave me an error.

1 year ago

[deactivated user]

    This is not portuguese. I have continued with this program because I am interested in learning but it really annoys me that something is offered as "Portuguese" and it's actually "Brazilian". Yes, I know Brazilian is Portuguese but they do have their own dialect and their own words in many cases. Why can't something that claims to be Portuguese be that: Portuguese!

    6 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/margotpingu

    Some basic facts for you: This is Portuguese the way that Brazilians speak it, but they're the same language, pronunciation differs and usage of some grammar and vocabulary differ. The population of Portugal is meager (10.6 million) compared to Brazil's (nearly 200 million). Duolingo is a tool to learn the most useful practice of the Portuguese language. In conclusion, "Brazilian" is not a language. It's Brazilian Portuguese, just as the flag in the upper left-hand corner suggests.

    6 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Scutigera

    "Meager" is a bit disparaging.

    There are more than 100 million in the Portuguese diaspora including in the US, UK, France, Germany, Netherlands, Israel, Canada, Angola, Mozambique, East Timor, Goa, Macau (the last few where they speak EU versions of Portuguese not Brazilian as official languages) and many more. This includes 40 million Brazilians with recent Portuguese heritage.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portuguese_people#Portuguese_diaspora

    Part of this has been exploration (and yes, colonization, for which Brazil would not be Brazil and would look very different... probably much more Spanish) but in recent times it was the 50 year dictatorship of Salazar (from 1933~ to 1974) that drove people out of Portugal:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Estado_Novo_(Portugal)

    There are also over 740 million in Europe who are more likely to visit Portugal than Brazil. It is nothing for a person in London to catch a plane for the weekend to Lisboa. Sometimes less than 20€.

    Add to that the Erasmus program which shuffles students (of all ages) to different countries in Europe (including Turkey which has 75+ million not included in the above Europe population) and there is actually quite a market for European Portuguese, or as the Portuguese like to call it, "Portuguese."

    But hey, let's talk DL numbers. Greece and the Czech Republic each are about equal to Portugal in population. Sweden, Hungary have only 9 million in their countries. Denmark and Norway just over half that with 5 million each. Ireland less than 5 million. Welsh is 3 million. Yet those are still languages offered by Duolingo. Funny that.

    So it cannot just be about the shortsighted numbers.

    Also, those in Brazil already hopefully know Brazilian Portuguese... :)

    But for sure the Brazilian version is well supported by many other programs and websites.

    It is certainly easier to learn the Brazilian way after learning the original Portuguese, but considerably more difficult the other way around.

    Just some more facts I guess.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AnneChernett

    Scutigera - hear hear I agree. Mel - stick with it. It gets easier and you'll end up with double respect. I learned Chilean Spanish before needing Spanish Spanish in Spain. I understood and was understood and even complimented on speaking like the locals (their accent was like the Chilean one). I'm now jumping between European Portuguese to Brazilian Portuguese lessons. I've just had a weekend with my new extended Portuguese family and then listened to a radio story set in Brazil. I'm still at a toddler stage of understanding and speaking but amazed myself that switching from one to the other was so easy.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Scutigera

    Thank you for the support AnneChernett. I figured I'd be down-voted into oblivion as those are numbers too. =]

    Congrats on your abilities and efforts and the fruits they have borne. :)

    The lucky thing is that the Europeans will understand you if you speak in the Brazilian way in part because they have Brazilian (and US and UK too) shows on TV, but it is harder to understand the Europeans yourself if you are used to the Brazilian forms.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AnneChernett

    I think Mel and Margot may have moved on as their comments are 4 years old :-) but I still enjoy following these discussions. When they are not silly they are usually interesting....and even silly can be a good laugh.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/mondlichtnd
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    Duolingo is teaching/focusing on Brazilian Portuguese, a perfectly valid variant of the language. That's why you are going to see a preference for Brazilian vocabulary.

    6 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Frencesca

    Look at the flag in the toolbar: it is Brazilian, so don't complain.

    5 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/jsknight

    mel106, você é ignorante. A próxima vez você quer fazer comentário, pensa antes de aparecer como uma idiota. Aprende isso e responde.

    5 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/jcorrea312

    Womp womp lol

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/AnneChernett

    I'm English and can understand most Americans and Australians when they use funny words and accents so it is a totally positive thing to learn Brazilian Portuguese when I really want to learn European Portuguese. (It's my son who has the Portuguese girlfriend :-) ) I'm finding the European Portuguese words pop up in these wonderful discussions we are having.

    3 years ago
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