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https://www.duolingo.com/MaxKrieger

Agxas vs Agxa?

Sorry, couldn't find anything on this. Age isn't a verb, why is there a -s ending for some adjectives such as agxa? Is it present tense?

3 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jcreed
jcreed
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It's actually a very common pattern in esperanto to use verbs for things that would normally be expressed by adjectives in english. "kiom vi aĝas" (= "how old are you") does in fact contain the present tense conjugation of the verb "aĝi". Similarly I can say "tiu floro ruĝas" just as legitimately as "tiu floro estas ruĝa" --- both mean "that flower is red". Even though the first is sort of literally "that flower reds", it's a quite ordinary, idiomatic, well-understood esperanto way of saying it. (but "estas ruĝa" is also fine!) "Mi feliĉas" = "Mi estas feliĉa" = "I am happy", and there are several more examples here: http://bertilow.com/pmeg/gramatiko/gravaj_verboj/esti.html#i-hjm (It says: "Alia maniero forlasi esti estas verbigi tiun priskribon, kiun esti ligas al la subjekto" = "Another way to leave out 'esti' is to verbify the description that 'esti' connects to the subject")

Oh, huh, actually now that I re-read PMEG on the topic, maybe ruĝas is supposed to have a slightly different, more poetically intense meaning than a plain old "esti ruĝa". Iu pli sperta ol mi eble povas aldoni klarigon :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/draquila

I wouldn't even call it idiomatic. It quite reminds me of Japanese, where it's perfectly ordinary to have the word for "delicious" or "red" be almost functionally identical to any verb.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcreed
jcreed
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Yeah, good comparison! By "idiomatic" I only meant the dictionary definition of "using, containing, or denoting expressions that are natural to a native [hah!] speaker.", though I might still be wrong about that, mi ne konas neniujn denaskulojn :) --- were you thinking of "idiosyncratic", maybe?

It also reminds me of the bit in Borges's story "Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius":

"There are no nouns in Tlön's conjectural Ursprache, from which the "present" languages and the dialects are derived: there are impersonal verbs, modified by monosyllabic suffixes (or prefixes) with an adverbial value. For example: there is no word corresponding to the word "moon,", but there is a verb which in English would be "to moon" or "to moonate." "The moon rose above the river" is hlor u fang axaxaxas mlo, or literally: "upward behind the onstreaming it mooned.""

eble: "supren, malantaŭ tie, kie alfluis, lunis"? :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/draquila

I generally understand idiomatic to refer to something that means something other than its literal meaning. For example, the English phrase "It's raining cats and dogs," is a good example of an idiom because its literal meaning has nothing to do with cats or dogs.

I wouldn't call this idiomatic because it's a perfectly ordinary part of the language's structure, much like the sentence 車がほしい (kuruma ga hoshii, lit. "car [is] want," but more accurately "I want a car") is formed using rules and words that are a perfectly ordinary part of the structure of Japanese.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orthohawk
orthohawk
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It's also something Zamenhof advised against.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/earthkissed
earthkissed
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age can be a verb. "you age well", "as i age i get more gray hair", etc.

3 years ago