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  5. "Usted va a usar la cuchara."

"Usted va a usar la cuchara."

Translation:You are going to use the spoon.

October 13, 2013

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmandaKarson

I have literally been laughing at this for like 10 mins, thank you so much!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josef.kore

"...and youre going to like it!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

Yo no quiero y tu me no puedes obligar!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P1GG1EP0W3R

NO ME GUSTA COMER PERSONAS, PADRE!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mistico19

Ah another attempt at the parent vs. baby mind trick.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kiltown

va sounded van to me on the audio. Anyone else notice this. OK I should have known because it is preceded by usted, not ustedes .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonbriden

Yeah, sounds weird, like she's saying "Usted vangsar la cuchara". Of course that made no sense, so I listened to the slow version.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyanaARI

Yes Bestia, we will have none of your uncivilized ways here. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nollymulli

Mi cuchara es muy grande!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markHayes

Would "vas a usar la cuchara" be correct also.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/THeNeeno

Yes, of course, although not if you're using 'usted' instead of 'tú'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmcgwn

Curious I've seen elsewhere that servir is used much more frequently in this context. Any native speakers from Spain and/or Latin America want to comment?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmcgwn

I didn't get what I was looking for so I went searching and found what I wanted. As you will see the verb servir is often used for 'usefulness' which I was getting at. Now I can share with others.

http://spanish.about.com/od/usingparticularverbs/a/servir.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/THeNeeno

Servir is to serve (as in to serve you dinner) or to be useful/useable (good/functioning, as opposed to something that is broken or poorly designed).

Usar is to use, as in I use a knife to cut something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melita2

If you are using it to eat, not to serve?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/One_Trick_Tony

No! Don't make me use that! Anything but the spoon!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tusy22

Spoon, knife why no fork?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArrigoDelaRoca

Este tenador me va a servir bien en la cocina.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mary.mclel

are 'usar' and 'utilizar' interchangeable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/THeNeeno

Yes, in casual conversation they are almost always perfectly interchangeable. Utilizar is more formal, and there will be occasions when there is a preference for one over the other, but they will both be understandable, regardless of which you choose. Usar is more casual. I don't feel like looking it up, but I believe it is a case where Spanish speakers took an English word (use) and utilized (: it as Spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JordanShackelfor

Why is it va instead of vas?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sat147634

Because the pronoun is "usted" and not "tú"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyanaARI

Él/Ella/Usted/(it) va, tú vas


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ella_Snow

Why does it have the "a" before "usar"? Isn't "usar" an infinitive that means "to use"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Liano-

Yes. Usar = to use. It seems like the English word for "to" is being used twice as in "go to to use" but this is not the case. The structure is like this; You (Usted) are going (va) to (a) use (usar) la (the) spoon (cuchara). Remember English and Spanish are not the same language and will not have exact 1 for 1 correlations with grammar. The use of "va a" is literately "it goes to" but that is not the intended meaning in Spanish. We use "going" in English very loosely, as it could mean the present or future. As in "I'm going now" or "I will be going tomorrow." In fact I can even say "I was going to go yesterday." In Spanish, I believe we only use the "ing" form for things that are happening right now. But that is a different topic. Here we use the structure: [Subject] (like yo, tu, usted, etc). + IR (conjugated for the subject in the present tense) + a + INFINITIVE SPANISH VERB. This means "going to do something" and is an easy way to talk about some thing that a person is going to do in the future only. Here are a few more examples. I'm going to sleep. = Voy a dormir. Are you going to play? = ¿Vas a jugar? They are going to eat. = Ellos (or ellas if all female) van a comer. We are going to arrive soon. = Vamos a llegar pronto. I hope this helps and is not too long of an explanation. It looks like you are on your way to becoming a polyglot with the German, Spanish, English and Italian. That's impressive. I'm curious, what is your native language?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daliadvorak

Utilizar and usar are the same ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SawyerStrombom

the funny thing about this is I have a tick comic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aterix

I keep getting mixed up with "la cuchara" and "la cucaracha" which are very different things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rildyn
  • 1483

There is no spoon.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertFruc1

Pero no es una cuchara


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_MsLexi_

Shouldn't it be "van a usar" instead of "va a usar" considering you conjugate verbs with the -an/-en/-in ending when using Usted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mortisimago

is it odd that you would be speaking formally to someone that you also were telling to use a spoon?

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