"What is your major?"

Translation:Welke studie doe jij?

3 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/I_Am_Robin
I_Am_Robin
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What is a major in English? Is it like a Bachelor's Degree or a Master's Degree?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AGreatUserName
AGreatUserName
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Robin: I'm a native English speaker (Australian) who is pretty confused about what Americans mean by major. For us, your major is your area of specialisation. So, for example, you might enrol in a bachelor of engineering and choose civil engineering or mechanical engineering or some other kind of engineering as your major. In the first year, most of the subjects will be the the same for all the majors and then you start to specialise.

Americans always seem to talk about their majors but never actually the degree. People say things like "I'm a math major" which, if I didn't grow up with American TV, would make no sense to me at all. We'd say "I'm studying maths" or "I'm doing a maths degree" as I'm pretty sure mathematics is a whole bachelor in itself and within that there are more specific majors.

As a real example, I did a Bachelor of Applied Science and I majored in (or "my major was") ecology. I don't really know how to say that in Americanese. I'd have to begin with "When I was at uni ... yeah, that's what we call 'college' ..."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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I don't think it's too different actually: it seems like the situation is a lot more similar between the U.S. and Australia than between the U.S. and the U.K., where they seem to not use the term "major" at all in an educational context.

I think we might talk about majors more than degrees because what your major is is much more descriptive of what you studied than what your degree is. There are (to slightly oversimplify) two kinds of bachelor's degrees in the U.S.: Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Science (B.S). Everybody who finishes colleges gets one or the other, and the connection of which one you end up with to your actual field of study can be quite tenuous (for one B.A. refers to "liberal arts," not "arts" in the more common sense, so it's perfectly normal to have one in a math or science field). But you have to have at least one major to get a degree, and it's a field you spend a lot of time studying, so it's a much more indicative summary of a college experience. To translate your sentence, we'd probably say, "I have a Bachelor of Applied Science degree," and either of your two options would be fine for the rest (except that Bachelor of Applied Science wouldn't be a common degree in America).

One wrinkle: if an American says, "I majored in XYZ," that means they finished college. If they say, "I was an XYZ" major, they might not have finished, might have changed majors afterwards, etc.

I think outside the "U.S" "degree" is used to reference sort of the entire college experience. Here, we think of it more as just the administrative credential at the end, so we can "earn" a degree, but it would be odd to "do" one.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markvanments

I think in the UK we would say the major is the degree subject. So a math major would be someone with a degree in maths. But you can't just replace "what is your major" with "what is your degree" as then you just get the answer "BA" or "MSc". You would have to say "in what subject is your degree" or "what are you studying for your degree".

Translating education terms is fraught with difficulties as every country has a different system but everyone thinks that their system is THE system. Each time I attempt to map my degree from the UK to a Dutch educational acronym I end up with a different answer.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NBL2015
NBL2015
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Which way is more common in Dutch (Welke is vaker in het Nederlands): 1 = Welke studie do jij? or 2 - Wat is jouw studie?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duovincenzo
duovincenzo
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I would say welke studie doe jij? As a native dutch speaker, or wat studeer jij? Is also good

1 year ago
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