"J'aime prévoir les repas."

Translation:I like to plan meals.

October 14, 2013

60 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gfmuffin

I like to plan meals. I love to plan meals. Is the "the" necessary? How is "I love to plan meals" said en francais?

December 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DXLi
Mod

    J'aime prévoir des repas.

    You may be confused because les can sometimes refer to generalities, but this is only true when that noun is the subject of the sentence or the direct object of a verb of appreciation (e.g. aimer). Here, it is the object of prévoir, so no dice.

    August 29, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnjoMan

    Ok but in this context 'i like to plan' refers to generalities so it doesn't make any sense.

    September 25, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oyttb

    That's what I thought too. For the little that it's worth, google translate does translate it as "I love planning meals".

    February 7, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markandrew

    "I like to plan the meals" would refer to specific meals. I can't imagine why anybody would ever say that.

    January 10, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterCollings

    "I don't like the times my parents come to visit, but I like to plan the meals"?

    February 18, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markandrew

    Yes, but that's in a clause, not a full sentence.

    February 19, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterCollings

    Well in that case "He likes to plan the activities. I like to plan the meals."

    It's clunky and a bit unnatural, I'll give you that, but I don't know, half the fun of Duolingo for me is sometimes figuring out how these sentences could actually be used.

    February 20, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/albans

    Does prévoir not mean predict, forecast ?

    October 14, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0liwia

    not only. You can also use it for planning: "Qu'avez-vous prévu de faire ?" "What are you planning on doing?"

    October 14, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

    I agree: not only, but also. Nevertheless I put I like to predict the meals and it was rejected. Why then?

    November 11, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0liwia

    Because in this context, it is clear you mean planning. If you were trying to say you predict the meals, you'd say "j'aime deviner les repas", I like to predict/guess the meals

    November 11, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

    Ah bon! Merci!

    November 12, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidB375676

    Why isn't "I like to preview the meals" acceptable? This strikes me as something a restaurant manager, chef, or food critic might say.

    January 19, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ExoticMatter

    What's wrong with translating « les repas » as "the meals"? I thought des refers to generalities, and that les refers to something specific (Think of « J'aime les frites. » vs « J'aime des frites. »)

    May 6, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gemsmum

    Nothing, in my opinion. I put 'I like to plan the meals' and it was rejected.

    May 17, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OakDoc1

    Moi aussi. I reported it.

    May 17, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeJeal

    It has just accepted that from me

    July 4, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nathanbash

    So 'les repas' at the beginning of a sentence can mean 'the meals' or 'meals in general' but here it can only mean 'the meals'?

    April 1, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salihua

    Same question - and the item just before this one was "À éviter après les repas ! = To be avoided after meals!" Where Duolingo omitted the "the" in its answer but did not count it wrong because I included it. The search for a rule goes on... when is the French "les" specific and when is it general?

    April 30, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/opensecret

    I don't think there is a rule -- it depends on what a writer or speaker intends, which has to be inferred from phrasing and context. "À éviter après les repas!" reads like a general rule, a French analogue to "Avoid after meals." But, in a given context, it might refer to specific meals

    April 30, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salihua

    But that is the point of this discussion, I think. If you are planning "les" meals how do you tell if it is specific or general. And in particular, how do you figure out what a particular "context" is in a one liner? What makes "planning meals" wrong? and "planning the meals" right - since they are both correct in English but mean different things. Usually when, as you say, there is no rule, both would be counted as correct.

    May 1, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/opensecret

    Agree -- planning meals should be accepted. Duolingo can be maddening at times because it omits answers that should be accepted, or, worse, tells you that the correct English answer is something no native English speaker would produce. But, that all adds to the challenge, and it's hard to complain too much about a free program that relies on volunteer labor. As I went through the French program, I reported every answer I thought was incorrect, and some of them have since been fixed. But apparently not this one. Also, if I was in danger of falling short in a given lesson, I'd usually put "the" in, even when I thought it wasn't needed in English.

    May 1, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markandrew

    It might help to look at it from the other way around: French pretty consistently requires an article for a plural noun, because in spoken language there's no plural marker! In the case of "repas" it ends with an "s" anyway, so you can't tell in print either.

    In English on the other hand we use the presence or not of an article to indicate specificity: "I plan the meals" must refer to some specific meals. I've noticed some other cases in which we use or omit the article for other reasons, but mainly it's about specificity.

    I think in French to get the same sense you could add a relative pronoun: "j'aime prévoir ces repas, là, moi." or something like that.

    May 1, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salihua

    Yes, that is true. And related to the les/des problem. I love animals = les, I love some animals = des. Simplistic, I know. To translate J'aime les animaux. you can either say I love animals or I love the animals - at least in this context free world of Duolingo. We all acccept the idea of 'les repas' - the question is whether "the" is required in translation. Sitesurf, We need you!

    May 1, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markandrew

    It depends. The article is required if we're talking about specific meals:

    " My colleagues and I are hosting a conference and we're each doing part of the planning. I like to plan the meals."

    But referring to meal planning in general it would be:

    " I like to plan meals."

    May 1, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/opensecret

    Le vs. les in front of repas does clarify, but different languages find different ways to disambiguate. Chinese has no plural markers (no declensions and no conjugations -- all words are invariant) and also has no articles, so a sentence like, "Ni kan shu ma?" could mean, "Are you reading a book?", "Are you reading the book?", "Are you reading books?", "Do you read books?", etc. If the sentence wouldn't be clear in context, a Chinese speaker could add assorted modifiers. So, "yi ben shu" would specify "a book" or "one book." Chinese speakers often omit the pronoun ("Kan shu ma?") if the context is clear, even though the verb gives no hint about the subject. That's common in Spanish where the verb form makes the pronoun clear, but less so in French where it often doesn't (e.g., je veux, tu veux, il veut vs. yo quiero, tu quieres, el quiere).

    May 1, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/just_call_me.ash

    What the heck, Duo? "I like to forsee meals" is not how we say it in English.

    November 20, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasGabr13

    I got this as the 'correct' answer, but am not sure that what is means. Is there some ESP involved?

    July 31, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donut-cake

    I put "plan out meals" and it objected. It makes sense in English, so maybe don't include "out" in the words that can be selected for this one.

    July 29, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bcrimando

    I understand the plan/predict distinction, but I used predict and Duo corrected me with forecast.

    April 5, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5clothilde7

    Forecast is a stretch in English.

    October 22, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lipcseibetti

    Forecast?!

    August 27, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dmgarland

    Ive never heard of anyone 'forecasting the meals' am typing it in to progress but is nonsensical to me. Maybe if i was a tv weatherman?

    February 18, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasGabr13

    Cloudy with a chance of meatballs.

    July 31, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophe993891

    Curiously, while "I like to forecast the meals" is accepted (being cheeky about plan/forecast), "I like forecasting the meals" is not. In English, these sentences would be synonymous.

    November 4, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5clothilde7

    So, "preview the meals" still marked wrong. "foresee"" the meals, is given as the correct answer - this is poor English. It's been reported, and duo has changed it's reporting options, so it cannot be specifically reported at present. A meal is not something one "forsees".

    February 8, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashlynshaw

    I thought préparer means to prepare.

    July 4, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salihua

    prévoir means to plan, to foresee, to expect, to anticipate, to schedule - And it is very easy to read a sentence and think that planning a meal is the same as preparing a meal. You are right; préparer means prepare, and it also means to make, to cook, to prepare for, AND to plan - but if used with food, it would mean prepare. If used in the context where 'to prepare for' is used, it could also be translated as 'to plan'. Very often the noun that is used will determine what verb you should use. In English, we say "he runs a store", "he runs the country", but we would not say "he runs the presidency" or "he runs his weight" so 'runs' sometimes means 'manages', but sometimes you can't use it in that sense...and it would be very difficult to explain why to a new speaker of English because the answer is just convention.

    July 6, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashlynshaw

    thank you a lot. That's helpful

    July 7, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lariwestside

    Can we get some consistency on the translation of "aimer" please... It seems every time I translate aimer->love I get it wrong, but when I translate like->aimer it is also wrong. The sentence should say "aimer bien" if you are looking for the word "like".

    September 14, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cephlin

    Aimer when used with people is always love. When used with verbs it is always like. For people to say "like" you would quantify your Aimer, for example "I love you" is "Je t'aime" whereas "I like you" is "Je t'aime bien".

    January 20, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomsonrc

    Why is prevoir just now being introduced when it's been used in previous lessons?

    January 6, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

    I have no idea what you're talking about. Could you explain?

    February 8, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NtateNarin

    It doesn't make sense that a word is now being introduced when it was used in previous lessons. Are you asking why a word is being used in multiple lessons? If so, it's so you can retain the word better through repetition.

    August 13, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasGabr13

    Yes, I'd say that it a rarely used verb in DL

    July 31, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avfs29

    Repas has no plural that I have learnt.

    March 8, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

    Or, rather, the plural version is the same as the singular.

    May 6, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SCMT1089

    For some reason Duo only provides the translation 'meal' when you click on 'repas'.

    March 20, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

    Because that's pretty much what it means. What else were you expecting?

    May 6, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lilymarthafont

    . . . But I don't like to make them.

    April 4, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markon

    I answered"I like to plan the meals" Duo says, I like to plan FOR meals. I think I'm right.??

    May 23, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

    I think you are, too. "I like to plan meals" and "I like to plan the meals" have a slightly different connotation, but both are equally good translations of the French sentence, given we have no context.

    May 23, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/markon

    My problem is that Duo says, "Plan FOR meals. Wouldn't that be prevoir pour les repas? I see on the top of the page that it means "I like to plan meals" but it wouldn't accept my answer yesterday on the app unless I said FOR the meals.

    May 23, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jojackie

    I put "I like to plan the meals." It marked me wrong, should have put -for the meals.

    May 26, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

    Since the "correct" sentence at the top of this page is given as "I like to plan meals" - i.e., without "for" - insisting on "for" if you say "the meals" is just silly. It's just an error in the programming. Report it.

    May 26, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alkajugl

    I had this as an exercise of writing what I heard. But the slow version was not given. I am not good enough to figure out oral French spoken at the normal rate, I need to hear the phrase repeated slowly.

    November 19, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Geoffrey878583

    Audio sounds like "J'haine" (which makes no sense) or "Gène" (possible abbreviation for Eugène?), not "J'aime".

    August 13, 2019, 5:34 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mme.r-h

    Predict and forecast are the same. I was right but you counted it wrong

    May 2, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

    Neither really suits this usage, though. Words can have different meanings in different contexts.

    May 6, 2016
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