"Jegsyngermedarbeidsgiverenminarbeidsplassenmin."

Translation:I am singing with my employer at my workplace.

3 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kfdurham
kfdurham
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This is so nice!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knoxienne
Knoxienne
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Sounds like a great job! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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We work in a barbershop.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samiwise

Dreamboss!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fool444luv

"Heigh ho, heigh ho..."...:)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KristinFraser

Can "arbeidsgiver" not mean "boss" in the way that "employer" can?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
fveldig
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Your boss is not always the employer, so you would use 'sjef' instead if you meant 'boss'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vesir85
Vesir85
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It does accept 'boss' though (at least now, a year later).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
fveldig
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It's a possible translation in some contexts, because 'boss' and 'employer' are often synonymous, but it's not the preferred translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahAnn67
SarahAnn67
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Does Norwegian have a word order rule like the German one about time, manner, place?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vtopphol
vtopphol
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Yes, I think so, but I don't think it is very strict. At least I would know when a sentence feels awkward, but it could be altered for emphasis. Both the sentences "Hun løper ofte fort" and "Hun løper fort ofte" would both sound natural, with a slight preference to the first sentence, but when you add a place, I would definitely use the form "Hun løper ofte fort ute". "Hun løper ute ofte fort" would, for example, be very strange. I guess the short answer would be that Norwegian follows time, manner, place.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidolson22
davidolson22
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Gotta love the word "work giver"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuzieRobinson
SuzieRobinson
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Wish I had that job...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kwonnnn
kwonnnn
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"in my workplace" should also be accepted, I think.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kirstm
kirstm
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it wouldn't mean the same. "in" implies it's inside. "at" implies it is in said location, without specifying where exactly (if inside, outside, above, etc.).

2 years ago
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