"She has a long nose."

Translation:Tá srón fhada uirthi.

3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tomasdeb
tomasdeb
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Tá srón fhada uirthi ach ta srón mhór air. Ní thuigim!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Ar + é = air

Ar + í = uirthi

And it's the difference between 'big nose' and 'long nose'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tomasdeb
tomasdeb
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Sorry - I wasn't clear. My problem is that DL accepted srón fhada uirthi but rejected srón mhór uirthi. Then did the opposite for "air", i.e. rejected srón fhada air and accepted srón mhór air.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Was it for the same translation? Was it 'long nose' for both, or was one 'long nose' and the other 'big nose'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tomasdeb
tomasdeb
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I think it was long nose for both - but don't remember at this point. There were a lot of problems with that section - "ag" versus "ar" needed correction.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trodaire

I'm having trouble. I put aicí instead of uirthi. I obviously got it wrong. Can anyone tell me they exact translations of these words so I can try and commit them to memory?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

Committing the individual words to memory won't help - in fact that's probably why you got this answer wrong in the first place.

Tá X aici normally means "she has X". But Irish doesn't use this syntax when X is a feature like srón or gruaig. When referring to such a feature, or to a medical condition or an emotion, Irish uses the preposition ar instead of the preposition ag.

tá leabhar aici - "she has a book"
tá srón fhada uirthi - "she has a long nose"
tá slaghdán uirthi - "she has a cold"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trodaire

So 'uirthi' is a description and 'aici' implies ownership, is that right?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

It's not quite that simple. For a start, these meanings only occur in combination with the verb - tá X ag Y, "Y has X", bhí X ag Y, "Y had X". ag on it's own doesn't imply possession, and even in a tá X ag Y sentence like tá fear ag an doras, ag indicates position - "there is a man at the door", not possession.

So translating tá X ag Y and tá X ar Y into English, and translating "have" into Irish rely on context. One aspect of this is indeed description/state versus ownership/possession, but that isn't sufficient to cover all situations, and sometimes you just need to be familiar with the traditional usage in both languages.

8 months ago
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