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  5. "Bana oy ver!"

"Bana oy ver!"

Translation:Vote for me!

July 14, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hasan_SALCIAV

"Give me a vote" is wrong, it says. The question is "oy ver" not "oyunu ver".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sainio

This one is difficult, because the literal translation ("give me a vote") isn't the way we'd say it in English. We'd either say "vote for me" or "give me your vote."

("Give me a vote" means something different in English. It usually means "give me a choice" or "give me the right to vote.")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hasan_SALCIAV

Yes Caitlin, it is very hard to choose the word when making sentences. I think it will take time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sainio

It's especially hard when the literal translation doesn't work. (And as Alex says, that happens a lot between Turkish and English: the languages are so different.) So it will definitely take time, but you'll get it. =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

"give me a vote" sounds really awkward in English. It is better to think of the phrasal verb oy vermek as "to vote" in English :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hasan_SALCIAV

:( How can i understand the sound is awkward or not. Grammatically it looks good i think :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

You are always able to ask native speakers. Some things can't be translated word for word (there are a looot of examples of this between Turkish and English especially). When in doubt, you can always google it or check out seslisozluk.com


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/venatio

I understand, but this is one of the problems when using translation as a means of learning a foreign language. You can always argue that you don't care about the context, but only the litteral meaning. There are always sentences that a native speaker would never ever use in any given context whatsoever, but that are still correct, strictly speaking. As long as a sentence is grammatically correct it is usually possible to imagine a made-up context where the sentence in question fits.

For instance: Let's suppose there is an idiomatic expression in a language which roughly corresponds to the English expression "out of thin air" and let's suppose that the way they express themselves is "eating air". Then you can always imagine a situation where an alien creature lands on earth and finds our air so irresistible that it cools the air until it obtains small pieces of frozen air and starts eating it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hasan_SALCIAV

Thank you, i am also using them but they are not like you of course:) Alışacağım sanırım.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexinNotTurkey

Alisacaksiniz kesenlikle. Calisinca olacaksiniz. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/giscowboy

Well, it's true: Get ready to ask, and you may already have received!;-) Starting back around the Health module, I was starting to have questions that neither Google Translate nor Googling in general could answer with any authority. This comes at a good time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexKarampas

I always find it interesting when phonetically simple words mean intricate things. It's so strange...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dragonrykr

Audio is a bit messed up - I hear vever

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