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"Níl siad chun an bosca sin a oscailt."

Translation:They are not going to open that box.

July 14, 2015

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freymuth

What makes this sentence future tense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

The way chun is used. Though, note that it's not a future meaning but expresses more of an intention (it's called the intentional form in some places). See here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NJI741534

Might this be translated as "They are not to open that box" - like a (negative) directive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1345

No. A negative directive is expressed with gan
gan an bosca a oscailt - "to not open the box"

Caithfidh siad gan an bosca sin a oscailt or maybe even better, Ní mór dóibh gan an bosca sin a oscailt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin750875

Why is "They do not intend to open that box" not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1345

For me, I don't quite see "They do not intend to open that box" as equivalent to "They are not going to open that box", and if I wanted to say "They do not intend to open that box", I'd use a slightly different phrase, such as níl rún acu an bosca sin a oscailt or níl sé i gceist acu an bosca sin a oscailt, or níl sé ar intinn acu an bosca sin a oscailt.

The chun in Níl siad chun an bosca sin a oscailt implies a slightly more active phrase than the planning implied by "intend", and works for a phrase like "they aren't going to do that because I won't let them", where "intend" can't be used.

Having said that, there are phrases where you can replace "going to" with "intend", but I'm not sure that you'd use chun to say those phrases in Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin750875

Thanks @SatharnPHL.

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