"Mia praavino venas el Rusio."

Translation:My great-grandmother comes from Russia.

July 14, 2015

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Argyle11

... inside a series of sequentially larger grandmothers.

February 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RomajiAmulo

What's the make up of "praavino"?

July 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

pra- "distant relative, great-, primeval" + av- "grandfather" + -in- "female" + -o "(noun ending)".

pranepo is a great-grandchild, prahistorio is prehistory (i.e. very very early history), praloĝantoj is indigenous inhabitants, etc.

July 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaidedbyVikings

do you stack "pra-" like you do with "great" in english?

August 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Majklo_Blic
September 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

Assuming you missed a comma: Yes, you stack "pra-", like you do with "great" in English. Or rather, regardless of English:

Yes, you can add a "pra" prefix to indicate the person is one more generation removed. And you can prefix "pra" again and again to add ever more generations. You don't need a hyphen, though it's allowed. A bit against the normal use of "pra-", it is also used for ever younger generations: "Nepo" - "pranepo" - "prapranepo" - .

June 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meerness1

This Esperanto construction seems weird to me. I would have expected "estas el Rusio" or "estas de Rusio" or even "venis el Rusio", but why is "venas" used? The great grandmother certainly isn't coming from Russia right now...

November 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2009

We say the same thing in English: My great-grandparents come from Russia. It's not the present progressive, that would be the "right now". The simple present is often used as the "historical present" or the "literary present": Hamlet is a Danish prince.

November 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meerness1

I understand how it works in English, but I would have expected it to be different in Esperanto, especially since the simple present is used for progressive as well.

November 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2009

In languages that use the simple present to also indicate the present continuous, context is sufficient to understand which is meant.

November 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BGXCB

Hamlet is a Danish prince because the play is currently being read and performed, it's always present no matter when it was written. Henry the 8th is not a king, he was a king.

"My great grand parents come from Russia" suggests they lived and died there, and their descendants emigrated. "My great grand parents came from Russia" suggests they were the one who emigrated. At least that's how it seems to me.

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardThor2

Respectfully I disagree. My great-grandparents almost certainly came long ago. Clearly the past is called for here.

March 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phle70

Maybe not your great-grandmother, definitely not my great-grandmother (no known relatives in/from Russia), but maybe someone else's great-grandmother?
:-)

January 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drofdarbegg

It's odd to me that el means from/out of/ of in Esperanto- after learning some Spanish it feels like it should mean 'the'.

It's not certain what inspired the word, but it may be from the latin 'ex', meaning from or of.

July 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Topenpe

By the way, I am sure that the prefix pra- comes from Russian and/or other slavic languages as it is just the same here.

July 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fajrdrako

It's easy to over-think this. The lesson teaches that this is the way this thought is expressed in Esperanto. It doesn't matter what other languages do or how they express it, this is what you say if you're speaking Esperanto.

June 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

Indeed. Sometimes, the amount of "like English" gets to me, though. I know that it's mostly mistakes in punctuation, and I know that this is Duolingo's en-eo course, but quite a few people probably are here because of the Esperanto, rather than the English. Having fewer comparisons with English would probably speed up learning for everyone.

June 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurentRam2

What's the difference between "mia praavino venas el Rusio" and "mia praavino venas de Rusio" ?

December 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2009

"Venas el Rusio" is how you say it in Esperanto. "Venas de Rusio" is wrong.

https://www.duolingo.com/skill/eo/Da_De

December 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_Azul

Not much, and in fact both are used. Still, "el Rusio" has the best papers.

June 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spesetmens

I always get the tense wrong because great-grandmothers are, obviously, dead. And therefore came from, not comes from, Russia.

July 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Not obvious at all. My wife still knew one great-grandmother. My daughter knows one great-grandmother.

I never knew any of my great-grandparents but that's to do with the age at which my family had children, not to nature in general.

July 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2009

It's what's sometimes called the historical present. It's also used when discussing literature: Hamlet talks to the ghost of his father (not "talked").

July 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BGXCB

His father is dead, but the ghost is present.

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phle70

... dead, except in the cases when they're alive.
;-)

My mother's eldest sister¹'s children² all have children³ of their own, and some of them have kids (yes, those kids are 1-(3?) years old, but they do exist).
Those 1-3 year olds' great-grandmother is my aunt, and she is very much alive.
:-)

¹ one of my aunts (born 1935)
² my cousins (they're all slightly older than I am)
³ my cousins' children - the oldest is (30?), the youngest are in their teens

January 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AusPole

I still have both great grandmothers, and I'm 24.

February 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurentRam2

What do you mean by "both" ? One is supposed to have four great-grandmothers. I guess you still have two left.

December 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Í know a baby whose mother is young and the baby has a very young grandmother and great grandmothers from more than one side and even a great great grandmother who is still alive and was so happy to see the baby. So I can't believe that you said that! I wonder how we would say "great great grandmother". Do we say "prapraavino"?

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siavel

Jes, vi pravas. "Prapraavino" korektas.

November 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Sed korektas ne estas ĝusta :)

Tio signifas rigardi ion kaj ŝanĝi ĝin tiel, ke ĝi estu ĝusta.

November 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2009

Ah. It means "to correct", not "to be correct". An important distinction!

December 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Precisely :)

And similarly, korekta means not "correct" but "to do with correcting" (e.g. correcting fluid could be korekta likvo).

December 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siavel

Dankon! Via frazo helpos min memori la malsameco.

December 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seanzan

Mi ankaŭ.

September 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gaby754722

How one says great-great-grandmother in Esperanto? Pra-pra-pravino?

August 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cvictoria42

That would be great-great-great-grandmother. Avino = grandmother, praavino = great grandmother, prapraavino = great-great-grandmother, etc.

September 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2009

I think so, yes.

August 3, 2017
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