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"The thief steals paintings from the museum."

Translation:Tjuven stjäl tavlor från museet.

3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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I'm extremely confused here. Is stjäla one of the verbs that don't conjugate with an r at the end?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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Yes, it is exceptional in that respect. It's stjäla - stjäl - stal - har/hade stulit.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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Thank you! Your explanations are always very helpful :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/israellai
israellai
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If anyone needs it, off the top of my head I can recall veta - vet - visste - vetat stjäla - stjäl - stal - stulit tåla - tål - tålde - tålt (I've always wondered how these verbs came to be so weird, especially since it's usually very common verbs that become irregular.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/as2907
as2907
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I also wonder why tål and not mål.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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Thanks for the list, saving it immediately :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryanAJParry
BryanAJParry
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The reason is kind of the opposite. Irregular verbs usually are the commonest ones -- in any language. The reason is that the irregularity is constantly reinforced by daily usage. On the other hand, less commonly used words tend towards becoming more regular. Why? Because the irregularity isn't reinforced, so there is more chance of people "forgetting" the irregular form or simply applying the regular form. For instance, I have heard fellow city-dwellers says "oxes" on more than one occasion. This is why the verb "to be", above all others, is so irregular in so many languages.

In short, the don't "become irregular", as you say; rather, they are better at maintaining their irregularity. Indeed, oft-times, these irregulars are regulars of an older regular system, e.g., the "strong" verbs of English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DonaldKidd
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It is interesting that tyda.se states "stjäla, stjäler, stal, stulit, stjäl". But I trust Duolingo to tell me how people actually speak!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Yeah - stjäler used to be the present tense, but it's a largely (though not completely) archaic variation nowadays. :)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiDressager

Yes I still had this as stjäler in my head because I had seen it written this way in a few novels of late... duly noted that this may be a bit outdated now!

7 months ago