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https://www.duolingo.com/italiaoo

ChineseToEuropean

Hi Chunshek,

can you find this discussion?

Off topic: I am a bit weary about this forum since I am sure somebody started this very discussion already, I just don't know what keywords to enter in order to find it.

This is the place to discuss courses for Chinese speakers who learn a European language.

I want to build a German course for Chinese speakers. How do we set it up? Probably we can just take the structure of the existing English-to-German course and translate the English part into Chinese. It might work out just fine. I am looking forward to finding out what kind of trouble German learners will run into and what kind of trouble we will run into when designing the course!

Ideas, comments? Who is planning to do the Chinese-to-English, Chinese-to-Spanish or some other Chinese-to-European course?

4 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/chunshek
chunshek
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Hello there! I have signed up to build Chinese-to-English and Chinese-to-Italian courses -- let's see if I get accepted.

As for building the Chinese-to-German course as you intend to do: I don't have details on how the Incubator works. But hopefully there will be an option for people to adapt from the existing English-to-German course, so at least there will be less work in terms of planning the lessons and more time can be spent on writing the lessons.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italiaoo

I think Chinese-to-English and Chinese-to-German should work pretty similar. Most difficulties should be shared. We will probably be able to share a lot of experience with each other.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sommerlied
sommerlied
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你好!:) I'm a German native speaker and have learned Chinese up to an intermediate level. From my experience, the most difficult things for learners are always the things that don't exist in their mother tongue. In the case of Chinese - German these are for example: plurals, tenses, conjugation/deklination. English speakers typically don't have as much trouble with plurals, for example, because they exist in English. So additionally to copying the current English - German, you may want to add a lot of examples to plurals and similar concepts unknown to the learner. Besides that, I think there are a lot of words and concepts in the Chinese language and culture that do not really exist in English/German, but a learner probably wants to learn how to express it. For example: 月饼 (Mondkuchen), 中学 (Mittelschule).

Right now I have first applied to help with Japanese - German in the incubator, but depending on how it works I'd be very happy to help out with proof reading the Chinese - German translations too :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italiaoo

"In the case of Chinese - German these are for example: plurals, tenses, conjugation/deklination. English speakers typically don't have as much trouble with plurals, for example"

Yes, for Chinese speakers learning German there may be some more trouble compared to English. Probably the German course should be designed slower, with more lessons around the same words, especially in the beginning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/italiaoo

"Besides that, I think there are a lot of words and concepts in the Chinese language and culture that do not really exist in English/German, but a learner probably wants to learn how to express it. For example: 月饼 (Mondkuchen), 中学 (Mittelschule). Right now I have first applied to help with Japanese - German in the incubator, but depending on how it works I'd be very happy to help out with proof reading the Chinese - German translations too :)"

And yes! Do you think the average German has an idea what a Mondkuchen is? 中学 can be translated as Mittelschule or as Gymnasium... Chinese and German schooling systems just don't match. Some people asked me for example how to say "热闹", renao, in German. It is an adjective that describes noisy, happy relaxed parties with lot's of people and everybody chattering loudly about. I think it's not possible to pack that in a single word in German or English. In Chinese you have 馒头 mantou which translates to "steamed bun" in English, then you have 包子 baozi "steamed stuffed bun", 粽子 zongzi, "a pyramid-shaped dumpling made of glutinous rice wrapped in bamboo or reed leaves (eaten during the Dragon Boat Festival)".

What about a dinner table conversation that goes like this: "Could you pass me the steamed stuffed buns please"? "Here you are." "Please pass me a pyramid-shaped dumpling made of glutinous rice wrapped in bamboo or reed leaves (eaten during the Dragon Boat Festival)!"

What do you think about translating mantou as mantou, baozi as baozi and zongzi as zongzi?

4 years ago