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  5. "Elefanten har tomaten."

"Elefanten har tomaten."

Translation:The elephant has the tomato.

July 16, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/purgamentorum

What a rich elefant


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emberglade

I was wondering if anyone else was going to mention this tomatoey god of an elephant


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JillK15

It sounds here like the "n"s are being pronounced at the end of the words... but they sometimes they seem not to be. Can anyone help with this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 492

The letter "n" should be pronounced at the end of words, but the "e"s before "n"s do live dangerously.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BRyeO12

Are those t's becoming glottal stops? it sounds like [ɛlɛfãʔn̩ hær tʊmaʔn̩]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FilipFilip17

You don’t seem to study Norwegian any longer, but just out of curiosity, do you hear the Norwegian “æ” as [æ] or [a]? My native language doesn't have [æ]. For a long time the English /æ/ seemed very similar to Serbian “e” /ɛ/, but now I can easily tell the difference. Now however, I keep hearing [a] in these recordings. I can clearly tell the difference between “er” [aɾ] and “har” [hɑːɾ]. What about you? How do you hear Norwegian “æ“? Here’s an example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BRyeO12

I sometimes have a hard time with distinguishing [æ] and [a] too since English (at least my dialect) doesn’t have [a] lol. In the link you gave, the /æ/ in ’lærere’ sounds like [a] to me, but when I looked up Norwegian phonology it said that Norwegian doesn’t have an [a]. It’s possible though, that that sound is somewhere in between [a] and [æ] and is just transcribed as [æ]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 191

I don't know too much about IPA so I might be wrong, but there does seem to be a short pause where you've marked one, that would be correct.

But much of your transcription seems to be incorrect, as all the a's should make the same sound, and there are no nasal vowels in Norwegian. I think these should all be [ɑ]. There should also be a t-sound before the n's. The 'o' in 'tomater should be [u]. The 'e' should be closer to [e̞] than [ɛ].

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Standard_Eastern_Norwegian_monophthongs_chart.svg https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPA_vowel_chart_with_audio


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BRyeO12

I was doing more of a phonetic transcription, based on how it sounded in this recording, I know a phonemic transcription would be different I know that Norwegian doesn't have nasal vowels, but the it sounded (to me) like rather than pronouncing the /nt/ it had a glottal stop (the catch in the word 'uh-oh') and left the vowel nasalized (because of the n), it's the same thing that happens in some dialects (my dialect) of English in words like 'can't' or 'rant'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 191

I can't say I hear any differences in the a's, but it should probably be close to [e̞le̞fɑnʔtn̩], as there seems to be a small pause between the 'n' and the 't', which I think is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sikeryali

The chef elephant :-P ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack467616

Is he a chef or what... ._.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noneofyour406564

It should be 'oliphaunt'

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