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"Mi havas unu nazon kaj unu buŝon."

Translation:I have one nose and one mouth.

July 17, 2015

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GastonDorren

So Esperantists are human after all - is that the message? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexDalton314

Way to rub it in your son's face that you got just the standard number of parts! I'm just saying....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

Sed du oreloj!


[deactivated user]

    CARBON BASED MONKEYS GO HOME


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BigMac_ComboMeal

    Strangan, mi havas du nazojn kaj du buŝojn.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

    Mi havas kelkajn ekstrajn krurojn, Ĉu vi volas interŝanĝi?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wilfred_Ivanhoe

    Ĉu vi estas indiana dio?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

    Ne. Barata.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lunafervojo

    "I've got" is another way of saying "I have" or "I've". Please reconsider.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael254537

    How about "I have a nose and a mouth." They indicate a singular item.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

    That would be Mi havas nazon kaj buŝon.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael254537

    Agree. I’ve also seen “cent” to be hundred and one hundred in this course. So it seems flexible. Thoughts?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

    Cent means both. a (one) hundred, and hundred. depending on context.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/High_Raccoon

    homoj estas tre similaj.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/realzaph

    I think that the audio sounds too close to "Ni havas..." for it to be marked as wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

    Many forget that some of these sentences have inbuilt context. "We have one nose and one mouth" is either allegorical or impossible (or one heck of a conjoined twin). Since the Owl is not too big into allegory we are constrained to accept that the proper pronoun must be singular.
    One of the regular online teachers here has a video which instructs folks in how to hear the difference between mi, ni, and vi. if you can find it, I recommend giving it a good listen.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

    I like the concept of "inbuilt context". I also think there's just some common sense that needs to be applied sometimes. "What is in your right pocket" always could be the opposite of "what is in your wrong pocket" - but it isn't.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

    One more thought:

    Since the Owl is not too big into allegory we are constrained to accept that the proper pronoun must be singular.

    It's also the normal way to say it in Esperanto. Consider the model (and non-Duolingo) sentence: Ni nenion povis vidi eĉ antaŭ nia nazo.

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