" bia ón bhfear."

Translation:The man wants food.

July 17, 2015

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ngarrang

need. want. This infuriating. Only Duolingo seems to make the distinction for Ta and teastaigh.

July 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dfpeterson

The worst part that the hints tell you that it is needs, but when you submit it says that the correct answer is wants.

October 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Some dialects do, actually. teastaigh can't mean 'want' in Connemara. And, as far as I know, the bí ó structure can't mean need

July 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

What's further confusing is that "want" in English can sometimes mean "need".

July 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmeraldBear

To me this looks like it should be translated as "Food is from the man." I'm quite confused, could someone please explain?

March 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dfpeterson

Irish has a very different way of expressing "want" and "have" than English. To say that someone wants something is to say that is from them. To say that they have it is to say that it is at them. To say "I want food" you would say "Tá bia uaim" or literally "food is from me" (and to make things more complicated, ó + mé = uaim. You will just have to memorize the Irish prepositional pronouns.) To say I have food it's "Tá bia agam" or literally "food is at me." Likewise, "you want food" is "tá bia uait" and "you have food" is "tá bia agat." Keep practicing and you'll figure it out.

March 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmeraldBear

Ok, thankyou very much :)

March 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter-Arthur

I'm still confused

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianEllio16

Think of "food is from me" as "The food is away from me" or "I am foodless".

November 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/T.Spammage

This was what I was looking for. "From" is being used as a current location, rather than an originating location.

January 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris804944

That's what i just learned and how I think of it.

November 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris804944

This is extremely helpful. Thank you!

November 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

There are other examples in DL where bí...ó is given as as "needs".

February 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mcdermottc1

Why "ón" rather than "ó" as in the tips and notes?

April 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ishoki02

Because "ó an" > "ón"

June 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/becky3086

Ok, now I am totally confused. This is the same sentence I just had but written completely different.

May 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

There difference is in the ón. The other sentence had ó without the <n> that comes from the definite article.

May 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neal356674

Hmmmm....so this could mean either "The man wants food" or "Food is from the man" depending on context, correct??

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Venamis1

So we have two sentences: 'Tá bia ó fhear' 'Tá bia ón bhfear' Why is the first one lenited and the second one eclipsed?

February 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1166

ó lenites. ó + an eclipses. (ó + an gives ón).

ar, faoi, roimh, thar, trí and um also lenite without an article, and eclipse with an.

June 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColmDuffy

Where is th "an"

August 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Inside the ón.

ó + an = ón

August 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Darren242763

How is it the man when theres no "an"

March 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1166

ó + an -> ón

March 24, 2019
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