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"¿Comerías carne de tortuga?"

Translation:Would you eat turtle meat?

0
5 years ago

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JefuGanbatte

I'd just say, "Would you eat turtle?" in this case, same as I would for most other animals. Eat lamb, eat chicken, eat horse, eat turtle. If I heard "lamb meat" for example, I'd question whether the speaker was a native English speaker.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackhammond

This is unique to modern english because of a mix of three languages after the Norman invasion of england in 1066. Anglo-Saxon (English) serfs produced animals and Norman (french) lords ate the meat. Cow - Beef Pig - Pork Deer - Venison Sheep - Mutton Calf - Veal But chicken was more readily available to commoners and thus has the same name. So I'd imagine an english learning spanish speaker would have a hard time conceptualizing the reason to call meat of animals different names. I know this reply is a year later, but w/e.

44
Reply32 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cgaultokstate
Cgaultokstate
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Chicken- Poultry

12
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LockeSchyler
LockeSchyler
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"Poultry" includes every bird we keep and breed for eggs and meat--ducks, turkeys, some pheasants, et cetera. It's a broad animal classification that can be used for their meat, but it doesn't refer specifically to chickens.

2
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdamReisman

Poultry is from Old French, not Old English.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cgaultokstate
Cgaultokstate
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Yes, my point was that there is in fact a French derived term for the meat of the chicken, like the rest of his examples.

3
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenZeller
BenZeller
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However, there are instances in Spanish where the same thing occurs:

Cow - Vaca; Beef - Carne de Res

Fish (alive) - Pez, Fish (to eat) - Pescado

5
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sr_yates

sheep - oveja; lamb - cordero

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Both words are words for live animals as lamb means baby sheep. On English we have mutton, but the first translation of that on Spanishdict.com is la carne ovina which is like this one.

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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It is not the same, as you need several words to say it. In Spanish the same word refers to the animal and its meat.

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Fell into the same trap. We could probably argue the point if it was lamb or beef, but I guess turtle meat isn't so common. Also, thinking how "lamb meat" would sound odd to us, I wonder how "lamb chop" or "leg of lamb" sounds to Spanish speakers.

8
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/withoutakare

I don't know, as a native English speaker I would say turtle meat, but I'd just say lamb. I'd also say horse meat. I think foods that aren't as commonly eaten can easily be said with meat as a clarification (although either way is fine). For example, I would say eat turtle meat, horse meat, but eat lamb, chicken.

7
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdamReisman

I think Withoutakare is correct. I'm Jewish and we don't eat pork. Within our small community, I've sometimes heard it referred to as pig meat because it's not a commonly eaten meat for us.

5
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I don't know if I agree about the native speaker part. Certainly I would understand it and might well say it, but alternative meats often do have the word meat added. There was a whole discussion about the Harvard Club serving horse meat many years ago. I always heard it referred to as horse meat or horsemeat. I was never a member so I don't know how it was listed on the menu. But I certainly agree that turtle should be accepted. Certainly Spanish often uses carne where we would not. No native speaker would translate carne de vaca as cow meat.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gaviota337744
Gaviota337744
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Because lamb isn't an animal (in the sense of species or other taxonomic grouping) whereas turtle (or sheep) is. People say "lamb" instead of "sheep meat". When the horse meat scandal occurred, that is exactly what it was called.

In this context, it's obvious through the word "eat" what they mean, but in other cases it wouldn't be clear if you were referring to a living animal or their dead flesh.

I'm a native British English speaker, and "Would you eat human?" (as another example) sounds wrong to me, whereas "Would you eat human meat?" sounds more natural.

1
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I am American and I agree. If it is not something that you really think of people eating, you generally will add the word meat. It did occur to me that I wouldn't be as likely to say it with snake, but maybe that's because they seem less like they would taste like meat. In Spanish it's not really clear cut. They use the animal name for pork and lamb, in addition to most of the things we also use the animal name for like turkey duck and lobster. But they have a "meat" name for fish (pescado vs pez) and call beef carne de vaca or carne de rez. I know we got our meat names from French, so that's inconsistent, but Spanish seems random.

1
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

I automatically used "turtle meat".

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lesorton

I thought "tortuga" was both turtle & tortoise.

11
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

It does. Did you use "tortoise". If so, please report it to Duo so they can accept that as a correct answer.

13
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GEOvanneGEO
GEOvanneGEO
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Is there a way to make a distinction between the two? Are turtles, terpins and tortoises all just tortugas?

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Sea turtle and desert tortoise. Turtles are marine animals and tortoises are land animals in English. Spanish only uses "tortuga modified with "del mar" or "de la tierra."

8
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LFCAlex

Going to use this one the moment I arrive in Spain.

"Hello, nice to meet you. Would you eat turtle meat?"

5
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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An important question for a proselytizing turtletarian (turtlevor??) to ask.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackKlumpp

is it me or does she pronounce "tortuga" weirdly

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wklem88

To me it sounded like the accent was on the first syllable. The accent should have been on the second syllable.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

She definitely stressed the first syllable. Wrong. It's a "tortuga", not a "tórtuga".

1
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpockTheLogical7
SpockTheLogical7
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It rhymes!! (Well, it does in English, at least.)

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sprkr
sprkr
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Shredder
Esta noche cenaremos sopa de tortuga.

3
Reply19 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Orelion
Orelion
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I was waiting for that one.

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicolleGiraud

There is a difference with turtle as in tortuga, and tortoises as in morrocoys generaly tortoises is used to translate morrocoys that are land turtles though there are some cases where tortuga is used for some land turtles there is a difference

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkSexton1
MarkSexton1
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Is "Could you eat turtle meat" a possible translation?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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My first thought was no, because "could you eat"="would you be able to eat"="podrias comer." But then I got to thinking about the close relationship "could" and "would" sometimes share. Perhaps, if you were merely questioning the probability, not the capability, then "could" could be used. However, to avoid ambiguity, using "would" would be a better option.

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Earlier, I used "could", and was marked wrong . It appears that, for DL, "podrias" = "could."

1
Reply1 year ago