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"Tá an córas méadrach cliste."

Translation:The metric system is clever.

3 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Patrick_Irish
Patrick_Irish
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... just not very popular

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

That's a bit of a mé féin attitude - it's popular everywhere except where you live.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mikemilg
Mikemilg
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I think that it would have been a much better idea to get rid of the Arabic number system, and make a new one in base 12.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

and except in the US. I would look at clever as being a very interesting translation with overt praise but covert ridicule because in my part of the world 'clever' has insinuation as being cute, like a trained monkey. Calling someone clever here is an insult.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL

That would require "glic" in Irish, not "cliste".

"cliste" can also be translated as "smart", but on the eastern side of the Atlantic, that's the word that's more likely to be used as an insult, especially when coupled with "arse".

"Smart" also has several other meanings that are not translated by "cliste" - the exercise does not mean that the metric system is neatly laid out and tidy, though I presume most native English speakers wouldn't take that meaning from the use of the word "smart" in this context.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

(Of course I overgeneralized again about the US, just mark it up to habit pattern interference and move on. I do recognize the US doesn't have monolithic language. I promise to try harder, also to never bring up the question of etymologies of Saxon versus Norman words. ;^) )

Mostly I want to point out that if you abstract from a concrete phrase the result varies. Here, and I mean Appalachia and not Philly nor Boston, you're more liable to hear the English version of "Tá sé cliste" used as an insult and the English version of "Tá sé glic" used literally.

This US regional variation and the idea of naturally evolved shibboleths* would explain your interpretation being different from mine, which is that the best Appalachian to Irish translation of first portion of the your word "xxxxarse" to be the figurative "dúr" rather than the literal "balbh", and certainly not "cliste" nor "glic". And I have no idea which would be more or less insulting to which speaker of which native dialect.

It would seem figurative 'best fit' varies. Figurative words are subject to wide variations of interpretation, depending on which brand of English is used by the non native reader. This is why I believe that in a basic course we should be exposed to the literal concrete translations of commonly used Irish phrases, just like a child would learn. We could postpone the figurative meanings until we establish a foundation. The natives will immediately brand us as learners, but that's true anyway.

*For the casual reader of discussions, shibboleth is an old Biblical word or phrase which has varying, often paradoxical meanings, dependent on the listener's background. Think of it as a password designed or used to identify friend or foe.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patrick_Irish
Patrick_Irish
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As opposed to the other typical kowtowing to whatever is new and shiny, also sadly popular with some types in Ireland

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

The metric system is superior, which is why it is the International System of Units uses it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rev._mother

The metric system is great when you’re doing physics. It’s not so great in practical everyday life. Probably because we do not buy fruit in quantities of base 10 orders of magnitude. XD

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patrick_Irish
Patrick_Irish
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Focus on actually responding instead of strawmaning. You are making an appeal to authority. However this is not relevant with the societal ambit of common every usage of the system within the wider social remit where it is based: that of common usage. Thus like the state of Irish teaching, the still widespread use of non-metric system shows how poorly how command driven education works, superior or not.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coconutlulz

What planet do you live on?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liamh3

Tá cónaí air sa phláinéad "Two Shillings and Sixpence, Guv'nor"

2 years ago