https://www.duolingo.com/oulenz

Finished with golden tree! (some thoughts)

  • 15
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 4

First of all: thank you very much guys for creating this course! It took me hundreds of hours to complete it, it cost you more to create it. And you haven't been idling since, I was very impressed how quickly my reports were processed, every day.

I thought the course was very well set-up, I particularly loved the many pop culture references.

Some minor suggestions for improvements:

  • I missed an explanation of the difference between passives with være and passives with bli . (I'm guessing it might be similar to German and Dutch)
  • My impression is that English and Norwegian use the simple past and the present perfect somewhat differently. I would have loved to learn more about this. (But I realise this is hard to teach in Duolingo, because usually several translations can be right in different contexts.)
  • I would say that almost without exception, ham in audio exercises sounds like han, which is as grammatical but not accepted. Have you talked to the developers about allowing additional answers for audio exercises?
  • There's a small mistake in the first sentence of the future preterite note

I am not going anywhere, one take-away for me was that I learned most from repeating lessons. So I'll try to keep my tree golden and to reach level 25! I am already looking forward to the bonus skills and who knows, perhaps some day an expanded tree!

7/20/2015, 1:46:46 PM

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/otsogutxi
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5

Gratulerer! I finished my Norwegian tree also, so I now how you feel:) Amazing, isn't it?

7/20/2015, 1:50:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/oulenz
  • 15
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 4

Gratulerer også! Det føles veldig bra!

7/20/2015, 1:56:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Don_Cristian
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 22
  • 15
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

congrats ! my Norwegian and Danish are still uncompleted. Would you feel confident to chat with someone in Norwegian now ?

7/20/2015, 2:01:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/oulenz
  • 15
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 4

I've been living in Norway so I've been having conversations in Norwegians on and off. One of the challenges is that it's difficult to apply in a conversation what I manage to get right here on Duolingo.

7/21/2015, 10:26:25 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
Mod
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 174

Congratulations!

Good luck with your goal to reach level 25, and thanks for actively participating by asking questions on the sentence discussions!

Actually, the reason why 'ham' is disappearing from the language is because of what you just said, but there should be an audible difference if you listen carefully.

7/20/2015, 3:53:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/oulenz
  • 15
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 4

Thanks!

As I said, I'm just not hearing it. I guess the question is: is this something you want users to learn to distinguish?

7/21/2015, 10:20:56 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
Mod
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 174

Personally I don't see why 'ham' is even taught, but it shouldn't be harder to distinguish ham/han than mi/ni or med/ned. And because 'ham' is consistently used as the only best translation for 'him' throughout the course, it shouldn't be too hard to recognize when it should be used.

As for allowing multiple possible answers for listening exercises, I'm all for that. There are several words in Norwegian you can spell in different ways, and some homophones are distinguished only by a letter. Usually these exercises have to be disabled, which can hurt the quality of the course.

7/21/2015, 11:02:53 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/oulenz
  • 15
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 4

So if I may ask again: have you talked to the developers about this? I would love to know whether it is something they are aware of, and if so, what it is that makes this hard to change.

Unfortunately, the coda of a syllable is less prominent than the onset, and therefore it is actually harder to distinguish between consonants there. Nasals in particular can assimilate to the following consonant in this position, that's why it's indeniable, but improbable and i[ŋ]credible. And according to this article linked to by lorua here, most Norwegians say han, presumably including many who would write ham.

7/21/2015, 2:35:55 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/malkin50

Ham/han could be harder to distinguish than the mi/ni and med/ned because the m/n is in final position.

7/21/2015, 6:54:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
Mod
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 174

I realized they might be bad examples, but I couldn't come up with any better. 'lam/land' and 'kam/kan' might be better, and these can easily be discerned.

7/21/2015, 6:58:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/malkin50

My Norwegian is pretty rusty--I lived there in the 1970s and it's not like I use it routinely (or ever).

7/21/2015, 7:59:43 PM
Learn Norwegian (Bokmål) in just 5 minutes a day. For free.