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https://www.duolingo.com/Johan_Fayez

For which pronoun can we use '' Su/sus ''?

Johan_Fayez
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Hola amigos, For which pronoun can we use '' Su/sus ''? And '' suyo/ suyos/ suya/ suyas '' ? If we are in a conversation, how can we differentiate or know the '' su/sus/suyo/suyos/suya/suyas '' talks about his, her, your (formal), their, theirs, yours (formal)?! I got confused between them. Can anyone help me! Gracias

3 years ago

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ElimGarak
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johan_Fayez
Johan_Fayez
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but, it is written in both websites (his/her/your/their). I know how to differentiate between Posessive Pronouns and Posessive Adjectives. I want to know when we use '' su '', how can we know that the person that is talking talks about (his/her/your)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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you know whether it is his/her/your/their through context, referring back to the verb and the previous pronoun, if any. Sometimes you just have to guess. Es su árbol - it's his tree, it's her tree, it's your tree, it's their tree, quien sabe?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElimGarak

In DuoLingo, I've noticed whichever one you use, it gets counted right. But in general, you would rely on the context of the sentence: "Una chica fiel de una aldea de México quiere llenar su bolsa de monedas para comprar una joya para su novio." In this sentence, the context tells you than the coin purse and the boyfriend is hers, and this next one the items are his. "Un chico fiel de una aldea de México quiere llenar su bolsa de monedas para comprar una joya para su novia". I guess it's a distinction that you get the feel for over time as you work with possessives.

3 years ago