https://www.duolingo.com/ThalianeTeles

Cronograma de estudos, como devo me organizar?

Já li várias coisas daqui, todos os tópicos possíveis, mas ainda me encontro bem confusa e não consigo colocar no papel um cronograma organizado =( Nem sei por onde devo começar, apesar de conhecer sites bons destinados pra todo o tipo de treino no inglês. Alguém pode me dar dicas pra montar um? Obrigada desde já!

3 anos atrás

7 Comentários


https://www.duolingo.com/RilkerBH
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Oi.

Uma vez recebi um e-mail do Olly Richards que fala sobre cronograma de estudos de idiomas (japonês no caso dele).

Segundo ele, foi muito efetivo na época. E foi o modo que ele achou de realmente aprender japonês depois de muito tempo "preso" sem conseguir aprender mesmo vivendo no Japão.

Aqui vai o e-mail quase que na íntegra, Haha:

"Hi Rilker,

I'm sure you've noticed by now that I'm big on using routines in language learning :)

So, just how serious are you about learning your target language?

If you're really serious, you simply have to have a serious routine to boot.

Teachers teach. Taxi drivers drive. Pilots fly. Language learners... well, they learn languages. Not once a week - but at every opportunity.

Last week I gave you an idea for how to build a simple routine, but today I'm going to show you what's really possible if you want to take your language learning to the next level.

It's an excerpt from a guide to learning Japanese (reproduced with kind permission), but as you'll see, you can adapt any of these ideas easily for any language.

A Serious Language Learning Schedule

The schedule is based around a 9 to 5 job, but can be easily tweaked to fit any lifestyle or work schedule. Keep in mind that this schedule represents a best-case scenario where you use all possible opportunities to immerse yourself in Japanese. I don't expect that a normal human being will do all these things every single day. Just try to do as much as you can most of the time, and you will be on the right track.

7:30 am: Wake Up. I take three deep, conscious breaths to start the day off right. I remind myself how excited I am to be learning Japanese, and how important learning the language is in my life. I then spend 10 minutes playing a kana game on my iPhone.

7:40 am: Shower. Using the steamed-up shower door, I write out as many kana as I can from memory. If the mood takes me, I also sing lines from Japanese children's songs hoping that nobody is listening...

7:50 am: Getting Ready. I play a "Newbie" level episode from the JapanesePod101.com podcast as I get ready.

8:10 am: Breakfast. I prop my iPad up on the counter and begin playing an episode of Cowboy Bebop with English subtitles turned on while cooking and eating breakfast.

8:30am: Commute. As I contend with rush-hour traffic, I listen to an episode of Japanese with Michel Thomas or Pimsleur, making sure to speak aloud when prompted. This works great since I am alone in my car, but I would probably opt for listening to a podcast or reading manga if I were on the bus or train.

9:10 am: Morning Meeting. Yay, meetings! Everyone's favorite. Instead of doodling, checking email, or just zoning out, I instead use the opportunity to discreetly study. My colleagues think I am looking at the same boring PowerPoint on my laptop that they are, when I am in fact going through my Japanese Core 2000 deck in Anki.

12:30 pm: Lunch. I read 5 pages from hodou no owaru tokoro, the Japanese translation of Where the Sidewalk Ends). I read first for understanding, quickly highlighting-but not yet looking up-any unknown words or structures. After I've given a page a once through, I then go back and look up any unknown words in the Midori app on my iPhone or using Tangorin.com if my laptop is handy (the latter is preferable because you can directly export saved words to Anki). If I want to look up any new structures, I first use Tatoeba.org to see if I can figure the patterns out on my own, and then consult A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar if I'm still unsure.

1:30 pm: Tutor Session. I go back to my car, fire up the Skype app on my iPhone, and have a 15- minute chat with my tutor. I ask him questions about particular words, phrases, and constructions that came up in that day's listening and reading activities. I find this type of tutoring to be far more effective for me since the entire session is focused only on what I don't yet understand, and far easier for the tutor since they then don't have to prepare a "lesson" in advance.

1:45 pm: Anki Session. I go back to my desk and finish up my lunch break with a quick 10-minute Anki session. I am pleased to hit the green button on some cards that proved more troublesome this morning.

4:30 pm: Afternoon Meeting. Oh boy, more meetings! Since the afternoon meeting is even more worthless than its morning counterpart, I discretely look up some new words that came up during my lunch-time tutor session.

5:30 pm: Commute. I listen to the rest of the Michel Thomas CD from this morning. Again, I make sure to actually speak aloud when prompted as passive understanding is far less important than active recall.

6:30 pm: Gym. I re-listen to this morning's podcast episode as I warm up on the treadmill, and then listen to some high-octane Japanese music as I hit the weights.

7:00 pm: Dinner. I wind down from the day with another episode of Cowboy Bebop or re-watch this morning's episode if I'm feeling extra motivated. The wonderful music gets my toes tapping and head bobbing as I cook.

7:30 pm: Nightly Entertainment. I stream a Japanese movie on Netflix. To help prevent the blue light from screwing with my circadian rhythm and making it hard to fall asleep later, I don my geeky orange glasses, dim the lights, and turn the brightness down on my device.

9:30 pm: Before Bed. I listen to another Newbie level episode from JapanesePod101.com as I brush my teeth and get ready for bed.

9:45 pm: In Bed. I crack open hodou no owaru tokoro and re-read the pages I went through during lunch, and read another 5 pages.

So there you have it!

Now, you're probably not going to be able to do as much as this in one single day, but...

...this is what's possible.

What can you take away from this? How can you adapt your schedule to squeeze a few extra drops out?

When I saw this schedule myself, it really made me think about just how many hours in the day can be made available for language learning if we want it badly enough!

So, what I want you to do before you move on with your day is this:

Grab a bit of paper and write down 5 points in your day where you could fit in some language work Gather the resources you need to do this Start today!""

3 anos atrás

https://www.duolingo.com/ThalianeTeles

Muitíssimo obrigada!

3 anos atrás

https://www.duolingo.com/MikaelMello
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Não o conheço, mas esse Olly Richards ganhou meu respeito!

3 anos atrás

https://www.duolingo.com/alex900001

Deve dar certo, ele fala oito idiomas. Vou tentar.

3 anos atrás

https://www.duolingo.com/MikaelMello
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A resposta de RIlker tá excelente, enquanto a minha vai ser só um link, aqui vai uma rotina, que não é tanto uma rotina, mas funciona! https://www.duolingo.com/comment/1345268

São coisas simples para se fazer diariamente e se você fizer todo dia, com certeza bons resultados virão! Se fizer estas coisas além de outras, aprenderá ainda mais rápido!

Também recomendo fortemente o guia do AJ Huge, aqui

Cujo está adaptado em texto aqui: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/1567214

Você pode encontrar as sete partes do guia aqui: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/9616711

3 anos atrás

https://www.duolingo.com/ThalianeTeles

Obrigadaaaa!

3 anos atrás

https://www.duolingo.com/lucasnunes28

oii

3 anos atrás
Aprenda um idioma em apenas 5 minutos por dia. De graça.