"Níliontuachdlíodóirí."

Translation:They are only lawyers.

3 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/vkigus
vkigus
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Famous last words.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eikoopmit

Wouldn't it be "they are not only lawyers"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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A more literal translation might be 'there is no(thing) in/to them but lawyers', and thus 'they are only lawyers'. That's not super accurate, but it might get the meaning across.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/obekim
obekim
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I would suggest that "They are not only lawyers" could be "Ní hamháin gur dlíodóiri iad" ["Not only that are lawyers they"].

See this example from http://www.focloir.ie/ga/dictionary/ei/neighbour:

"they're not only our neighbours but also our friends - ní hamháin gur comharsana dúinn iad ach is iad ár gcairde freisin iad"

I don't know if this construction can, not only introduce an "ach" clause, as above, but also be used absolutely.

Someone else might be able to enlighten us further.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnClayborn
JohnClayborn
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Thats what i thought too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

Wait til you get the bill.You wont be laughing then !!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tooraloorali

What about "They are nothing but lawyers?" To me that has the same meaning as "They are only lawyers" and is slightly closer to the Irish wording.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AllyT2
AllyT2
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Can someone explain the use of the negative article even though there is no negative article in the sentence?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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A literalish translation would be “There isn’t in them but lawyers” — the “not … but” structure is used to express the meaning of “only”, akin to “You ain’t nothing but a hound dog” meaning “You’re only a hound dog”.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicCol12

Did Elvis speak Irish !!!??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Not that I know of — it was Leiber and Stoller who wrote the song, and I doubt that either of them spoke Irish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vacuousWastrel

Or "it's been nothing but trouble" to mean "it's only been trouble".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TellTheSeal
TellTheSeal
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Does the sentence in Irish potentially carry that same implication? that is, that they are "merely" lawyers and somehow limited as such? or is the Irish sentence no more than a factual observation that "all the members of that group of people happen to be lawyers"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/teeling2
teeling2
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I tried the word "attorney" and it was marked as wrong. Is there a separate word for "attorney" vs. "lawyer"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Yes — “attorney” is aturnae.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lpilot13
lpilot13
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Hows about 'They are only but lawyers.' ? This is a common way of speaking where I am from but was wrong when I tried it. Thoughts?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Where are you from? I haven’t heard that idiom before.

2 years ago
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