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  5. "Sono biscotti al cioccolato."

"Sono biscotti al cioccolato."

Translation:They are chocolate cookies.

December 30, 2012

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marianik

if I say 'biscotti di cioccolato' is it wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yuujen

Un biscotto di cioccolato would mean the biscuit was literally made of chocolate rather than having chocolate added to it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2019Nadia

biscotti= cookies don't break your mind


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rayhunter

double baked cookies (BI-scotti)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGandalf

I'm confused as to what the translation for "al" actually is. Is it "of the"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamJuanMorton

i think it's used more in this context as an expression, something that can't be translated literally


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jesslc

Yes.

al literally means "to the"

But it can be used in expressions where English would use: "of", "of the", "with the", and so on. It's one of those things that you just have to learn whether the correct prepositions to use is 'a', 'di', "in", etc... because they don't always map to their English equivalent.

This sentence (Sono bicotti al cioccolato) is probably closest to the English meaning of They are cookies with chocolate (ie cookies with chocolate bits in them). With is usually 'di' in Italian. But you use "al and not "del" (del = di + il) in this situation just because...

(Actually I don't know if there's a reason why. When I studied Italian at uni we were told you just have to learn them - sometimes they match up to the English choice, sometimes they don't)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fynbeck

Wouldn't it be correct English to translate it "It's the chocolate cookies" (although cookies are plural)? I'm not a native English speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2473

No, the plural form of "it" is "they".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Taran803651

I used the word biscuit and got flagged as incorrect, when thats my country's word for it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2473

Duolingo is an American company, and over here a biscuit is something very different.

https://sugarspunrun.com/easy-homemade-biscuits/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unicorngod

If "Sono" is at the beginning does that mean "They are"? When would it be "The cookies are chocolate"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2473

I biscotti sono cioccolato, or something more of that form. Kind of similar to the difference in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agrover112

Remember Loron sono ragazzi . I guess we can leave out Loro or Io sometimes considering they understand the context is plural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2473

Yes. "Essere" is a verb of state, which means it compares or equates the subject and the predicate. No action is involved.

And since "io" is singular and "loro" is plural, it is generally obvious from the predicate whether the implied subject pronouon is "io" or "loro".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maria354859

Biscuits / cookies . Both are a biscuit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2473

In British English, maybe. In the USA, biscuits are something very, very different. Think of savory scones.

https://www.livewellbakeoften.com/easy-buttermilk-biscuits/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jess731931

Why is it that the phrase "they are the grapes" uses è while this phrase uses sono? The explanation in the post regarding the grapes is that for objects, essi is used. However, wouldn't that apply to cookies as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2473

In English, we count the individual grapes and use the plural. In Italian, they look at the bunch as use the singular. Like we have "peas" but "corn".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jess731931

Thanks! Even though I've read so many of the posts under the grapes discussion and seen this before, for some reason your explanation just made the verb conjugation part of it click for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linnea402727

How come "chocolate" is not in plural as well when cookies are?

"Biscotti ai chocolata" instead of "biscotti al cioccolato"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2473

Because "chocolate" is not an adjective, it is a noun. Only adjectives change to reflect nouns. Nouns do not change with other nouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouPasques

I don't understand the use of sono meaning "they are"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2473

In Italian, subject pronouns are mostly optional. You can almost always tell from the verb whether the subject is 1st, 2nd, or 3rd person, singular or plural.

"Essere" is irregular and the "io" conjugation is the same as the "loro" conjugation, but since it's a linking verb, the subject complement in the predicate must agree with the subject. Since "biscotti" is plural, the subject must also be plural (also, context tells you it's very unlikely that someone is saying "I am chocolate cookies").

https://www.italian-verbs.com/italian-verbs/conjugation.php?parola=essere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eataly3

come on !...something practical ....like "they have"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2473

This is teaching you that sometimes it is best to not have a subject pronoun at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acuencadev

What? That sounds weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2473

What's so weird about chocolate cookies?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acuencadev

These are chocolate cookies... Makes more sense to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2473

These things over here are chocolate cookies.
Those things over there are chocolate cookies.

See what I have on this plate?
What are they?
They are chocolate cookies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeeCurry1

"They are chocolate cookies" doesn't make sense, but when I put "There are chocolate cookies", I got it wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2473

How does "They are chocolate cookies" not make sense?

"I made some things for dessert."
"What are they?"
"They are chocolate cookies."

The existential "there are/is" (ci sono/c'è) means something very different and is not an appropriate translation.

"Hey guys, there are chocolate cookies in the break room."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ginger_cookie

Do you call biscotti cookies or biscuits? I prefer cookies!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neil636005

Depends which side of the Atlantic you're on if you're native. Here in England cookies are very specific type of biscuit. I like all sorts of biscuits... and I love cookies :p

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