https://www.duolingo.com/hermens

Native Dutch speaker here!

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Hey everyone,

I know how hard learning a language is, especially if you don't have a lot of conversational practice. Since it's summer and I've got some time on my hands, I'd be very happy to help someone with their Dutch! Skyping, chatting, emailing. I've got a blog ( dewinthedawn.tumblr.com/ask ), so if you want to chat, you can drop your skype/email there, so only I'll be able to read it, instead of posting it here for everyone to see.

Hallo iedereen,

Ik weet ❤❤❤ moeilijk een taal leren is, zeker als je schrijven en spreken niet goed kan oefenen. Omdat het zomer is en ik dus wat tijd over heb, zou ik graag iemand willen helpen om nog beter te worden in Nederlands! Skypen, chatten en emailen kunnen allemaal. Ik heb een blog, dus als je geinteresseerd bentin mijn voorstel, dan kun je daar je email/skype naam in schrijven, zodat alleen ik het kan zien, in plaats van iedereen hier op de duolingo site.

Hoop graag van jullie te horen!

July 22, 2015

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/damnjan
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Hi, I am very confused with pronouncing of "r" in some Dutch words, like, for example, "Rotterdam" and "Amsterdam". I searched the internet for pronunciations and found some people pronouncing R like in French/German (just like I heard in trains/metros when I was there), and some people say it with soft R like in English. So, what gives? I understand that like in every country there are different dialects and pronunciations, but how do we know what is the 'official' way of speaking? For example, I am interested in learning to speak Rotterdam and Amsterdam way, but do people from those 2 cities talk the same way or there are differences (minor/major)?

Thank you very much

July 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hermens
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There is an "official" Dutch pronunciation called ABN (Algemeen Beschaafd Nederlands) of Algemeen Nederlands. But, hardly anyone is able to speak it perfectly, since we have so many accents and different pronunciations. You also have to understand, Nederland is very small. Lots of people grow up on one side of the country and then move to a whole other part. Lots of accents and dialects are mixed because we're able to move so freely throughout the whole country. There really isn't one way you should pronounce words. Same thing with the R, there are a lot of different ways to pronounce it. Some to it with the whole throat-thrilling thing, some just make a kind of "hòòò' sound and others do something in between. The "English R" you're talking about is something really specific that only a small group of people do. They only do it at the end of words with vowels before the R. So, things like, "hoor" of "Woord". I believe it originated in Het Gooi (an area close to Hilversum) but as you can read here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gooi#The_public_image_of_Het_Gooi it also has something to do with people who moved from Amsterdam. I personally am not really familiar with all the different speech patterns of Amsterdam and Rotterdam but there are very specific differences, though I really can't name them for you. It's also a bit confusing to say "Ooh, I want to learn to speak in an Amsterdam/Rotterdam" way, since there are various degrees of having an accent, so to say. Most people, when talking to someone who doesn't have the same dialect as them, talk 'normal' Dutch with a slight accent. But, if talking to someone with the same dialect as them, they go full out and talk differently than 'regular' Dutch. So, it's hard to say what exactly an Amsterdam accent is, since there isn't one clear way that really counts as accent. My advise would be to listen to loads of audios of people talking in the accent you want to learn and trying to copy the sounds they do differently than normal Dutch. Which is really not ideal, since as I said, everyone Dutch person speaks slightly different.

Hope this at least helped a bit!

July 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/damnjan
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Dankjewel!

July 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/_Odin_
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Don't worry about accents, I'm East-Flemish, went to school in West-Flanders, I live now in Belgian Limburg, but I also worked and lived a while in The Netherlands. Not everyone moves that much but you get the idea, if you would hear me talk and ask me from which region my accent is, I wouldn't even be able to tell you. I could tell you it's a Flemish one but not really be more specific than that since it really changed through the years and it also changes depending to who I'm talking with. But there is no specific official way someone should talk, speaking with a different accent is not a problem. We all have different accents and there are no official dialects, just go with what's easiest for you. And if there's a lot of difference between Amsterdam and Rotterdam in accent, depends on who you ask, if you ask it to someone from those cities they probably tell you it's huge but that has another reason. :')

But there is no official Rotterdam or Amsterdam Dutch and some have a light accent while others have a more heavy one. Listen to the accent you want to learn and learn some specific slang words typically used in those cities. This is how they talk in Amsterdam: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1w9btL-PSo

This is probably useful for the Rotterdam dialect: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=excJ7am4ofQ

July 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/damnjan
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Wow thanks! Yes I hear the difference, seems like Amsterdam way of speaking is easier but Rotterdam sounds more cool to me I think :) I am glad that the differences don't matter, cause in my country (Serbia) the differences are very obvious to native speakers. People on the north speak way slower with some weird accents while people on the south speak very fast with accents on different syllables, which is mostly annoying to some of us who live in Belgrade, where we speak "normally" :)

July 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/rachidkamal

hi how are you?nice to meet you,,i hope we learn languages together , and help each other,,best wishes

July 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hermens
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Heya! Best wishes to you too!

July 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Xanatrix

Hey, I've heard that the Duolingo audio for dutch is not very good prounciation wise. Is that true?

July 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hermens
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Yeah, it's not very accurate, that's true. Also, we have to kinds of pronunciations for G. The "soft" G, as we call it, and the hard G. People with the soft G (like me) are mostly from the southern provinces (Noord-Brabant and Limburg) The audio here on Duolingo has the hard G, which is logical since most people pronounce it that way. But, here's the thing, from my experience the soft G is way easier for beginning Dutch speakers to pronounce. It sounds a lot more natural than trying to force that hard G sound out, which is why I don't think the audio is that great. It doesn't show diversity in how you can pronounce things, resulting in some people feeling bad for not being able to do so correctly.

For some reason I can't find a comparison of the pronounciation, but here's a video of someone talking with the soft G. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hPL6PCJGgZY I think, if you've only heard the hard G before, you'll be able to tell the difference.

July 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/_Odin_
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Actually it's debatable if most people pronounce a hard G. In The Netherlands you have Brabant and Limburg, and in Belgium everybody uses a soft G so if you take Belgium into the equation too, its probably 50/50. So for those having problems with the hard G it's ok to use a soft G.

And if you can't pronounce that one either and there's a H sound coming out of your throat, technically you still don't have to worry. In West-Flanders they can't pronounce a G either but I would advice to at least get the soft G right lol. :')

July 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/kamrelim
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Hello, I have one question - I read here (http://www.ielanguages.com/dutch3.html#order), that verb unless it's a question, must always be in the second position in a Dutch sentence. Can you explain me the order of words in sentence "/Omdat het zomer is/ en /ik dus wat tijd over heb"/, why do you put the verb is and heb at the end of the sentence? Thanks in advance!

July 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/_Odin_
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It is because she used 'omdat', when using 'omdat' the verb goes to the last position.

If she wouldn't have used that word the rule about putting the verb second is correct: Het is zomer en ik heb dus wat tijd over.

Other example:

Ik ben moe dus ik ga vroeg naar bed.

Omdat ik moe ben, ga ik vroeg naar bed.

The last one I'm not completely sure why the verb heb needs to be last besides else it would sound weird to us. But I think it has to do with the use of the word 'en', because if she would've used a comma instead of 'en' it would've been: Omdat het zomer is, heb ik dus wat tijd over.

edit: Here's a bit more info about omdat and using it in compound sentences: http://www.valley-trail.com/Building_a_Sentence.htm

And if I where you and you need to use omdat, it's probably easier if you use it like this: Ik heb wat tijd over omdat het zomer is.

There's nothing wrong with the one hermens used, but it probably only makes it unnecessary complex for you to use if you're not really fluent in Dutch yet.

July 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hermens
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I'm really sorry, but I can't give you a clear cut answer on that. I think it's a kind of sentence structure that I don't even think about. For example, "Omdat ik aan het koken ben en dus de keuken vies maak, is mijn moeder boos." It has to do with the bijzin ( http://taaladvies.net/taal/advies/term/21/bijzin/ ) but why I can put the verb at the end of the sentence instead of second position, I don't know.

July 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/nosaj10358
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I've been to Holland three times in the last two years. I love that country! I didn't want to leave when it was time to go back home. Ever since, I've always wanted to learn Dutch. Since I spent a month every time I traveled there, I did pick up some basic Dutch. But with the "G", I thought I'd never be able to say it properly. All I've ever heard was the throaty hard G. I like the soft G much better! I've heard the Dutchies speaking many times with the hard G three times in one sentence, and wondered "How is that even possible?!?" Thanks for the insight! I plan to continue with DL and eventually complete the Dutch tree. However, my priority is Spanish, as I'm much further along with it. I actually HAVE TO learn it because I'm getting married in Mexico in 4 months, and need to understand everything. hahah :)

July 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hermens
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I'm really glad I could help out! If you visit again, you really should go to one of the lower provinces. I really love them (bit biased, maybe, because I've grown up there) and think they're just as (if not more) beautiful as the north.

Best wishes with your wedding!

July 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/nosaj10358
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I spent most of my time in Haarlem and Amsterdam, but I also visited Maastrict for a day. I love how every city is so unique. I definitely want to check many more places in the future. I'm coming back , it's just a matter of time. My goal within the next few years is to move to Holland or Germany, as long as I can land a work contract there. :-) Dank je wel !!!

July 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ohdianediane

I am currently studying French but I would love to learn Dutch. My sisters are both in Belgium(I am planning to visit them, I'm from Philippines btw) and they speak Dutch well but they don't have time to teach me some because of their workloads. They partners are both belgians so I'm quite having a hard time communicating with them tho there's always the english language but still it will be much better and comfortable once I learned their language. I find Dutch a 'complicated english' bc some of the words are only spelled in a dutch way but still sounds english, yes? And the pronounciation of the words seems very difficult for me :(( Ugh.

July 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hermens
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Hm, I wouldn't really say that Dutch has an English pronunciation. I get what you mean by it, but I wouldn't worry too much about how to pronounce words. Dutch is pretty straight up with how it's spelled and how it sounds (as in, no letters you spell but don't pronounce or vice versa). So, if you ever do decide to learn Dutch, I think you'd pick it up just fine!

July 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/nosaj10358
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could you tell me the difference between "Het" and "De" I noticed that both mean the same thing but are only used in particular situations. How do you determine which to use?

July 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/_Odin_
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De is for male and female words Het is for neuter words

There's not really a way to tell which words are what, you have to learn them. If you learn words don't learn them like this: huis, boom, vogel

but learn them like this: het huis, de boom, de vogel

July 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/hermens
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You're totally right, but when using verkleinwoordjes in singular (busje, aapje) it's always het. So, if you're ever not sure if it's de of het, just make it smaller and put het before it.

July 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/WordFitlySpoken
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"...Just make it smaller and put het before it." Gracious, I never thought of that, I should totally do that, haha. :P

August 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/nosaj10358
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dank je wel !!

July 25, 2015
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