"She is taking some soup."

Translation:Ze neemt wat soep.

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ThisMuchDutch

I'd just like to know why the correct word "pakt" is not listed under any supplied translations of any word in the sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harold.aman

I have the same problem -- I thought I was going crazy for a moment

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/juliaaatan

why not sommige soop?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
Mod
  • 19
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9

"sommige" and "wat" mean different things, although they're both translated to "some" in English.

"Sommige" means some, but not other. So "sommige soep" refers to some specific kinds of soup, but not just any old soup.

  • Sommige soep is lekker - Some soup is tasty (but other soup is not)

"Wat" (in this context) means some, a little bit of. This is the meaning that makes the most sense in this exercise.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/millicow
millicow
  • 20
  • 9
  • 4
  • 49

So basically "sommige" is more like "certain" than "some"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hyacinth3704

Would this verb mean specifically the act of picking up the soup and making it hers, or can it also be used in the more figurative sense the way we sometimes might say "I take my tea with milk", or "I take a glad of wine now and again", "I take my medicine" etc?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drayne
drayne
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7
  • 2
  • 40

Why not "neemt"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jinglekeys
Jinglekeys
  • 17
  • 15
  • 13
  • 6

In what context would this be used? As in, what is she taking to work? She is taking some soup. Or something else? This is something that would rarely be said in English so I'm not understanding if it's common or not in Dutch.

1 week ago
Learn Dutch in just 5 minutes a day. For free.