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  5. "Do you speak Norwegian?"

"Do you speak Norwegian?"

Translation:Snakker du norsk?

July 22, 2015

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/soupandbread

Snakker du norsk? = Do you speak Norwegian? Du snakker Norsk. = You speak Norwegian. Am I right? I am curious about how to form a question. I don't recall it coming up in any lessons so far.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quis_lib_duo

Yes, you are right. (But norsk is spelt in lower-case.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/llexii1

whats the difference between dere and du?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan_D_13

Dere is plural (think "y'all"), du is singular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex135822

To English speakers this could be the plural and singular form of the word 'you' - so not sure how it's marked me wrong :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Both "du" and "dere" is accepted here. If it was a multiple choice exercise, you need to pick all the correct answers - not just one of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex232994

I wrote Snakker du norsk it said WRONG and made me write kan snakke du norsk?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saturnaaaaaa

Is there a difference between norsk and norske? Is one feminine or something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan_D_13

Norske is the definite singluar and plural of the adjective norsk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheenaBastet

What is the difference "jeg prate norsk / jeg snakke norsk"


[deactivated user]

    You used the infinitive form of the verb instead of present tense ( prater, snakker ).

    • å prate - to chat
    • å snakke - to talk, to speak

    Follow this link to watch a YouTube video where you're given explanations about five verbs (å snakke, å prate, å si, å telle, å fortelle) that all revolve about talking but are used in different situations and contexts. The video is in Norwegian so you might postpone watching it until you're at a more advanced level.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan_D_13

    Non-native speaker, but I think "prate" means "to chatter", while "snakke" means "to speak".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DunkelSibyl

    if norsk means Norwegian (language), what does bokmål means?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan_D_13

    Bokmål means "book language" and describes one written Norwegian standard. The other one is nynorsk ("new Norwegian").

    Note that both refer to how Norwegian is written. You cannot "speak" either bokmål or nynorsk. However, the pronunciation might be closer to how bokmål is written in certain parts of Norway, and in other parts the pronunciation is closer to how nynorsk is written. But all pronunciations are called "norsk".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Widi903264

    I wrote du snakker norsk, but it was incorrect. Should have been snakker du norsk. What is the pattern actually?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan_D_13

    "Du snakker norsk." is a statement (just like the english "you speak Norwegian"), "snakker du norsk?" is a question.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keturah272006

    Du snakker norsk is the direct translation but does it still work


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karnissa

    I hear the word "norsk" pronounced as "norSHk". Is this the only possible pronunciation, or does "norSk" also work?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan_D_13

    AFAIK It depends on how you pronounce your "r". If it's the "rulle-r" (with your tounge in the front part of your mouth), then r+s will be pronounced like the English "sh" (even if one word ends with r and the next starts with s! "Vær så snill" -> "væshåsnill"). If you use the "skarre-r" (at the back of your throat), then r+s will stay r+s.

    To listen to a few examples, see here: https://forvo.com/word/norsk/#no

    Deliciae pronounces it "noshk", while with Cazpinator it sounds very much like "norSk".

    EDIT: About "rulle-r" and "skarre-r", see here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VS-7RYY7S-w

    It's in Norwegian, but Karense starts with a very nice example of "rulle-r", and at 0:30 she demonstrates the "skarre-r".

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