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  5. "Tá geansaí acu."

" geansaí acu."

Translation:They have a sweater.

July 23, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trodaire

If this is "a sweater" or "a jumper" what is "sweaters" or "jumpers?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

The plural of geansaí is geansaithe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trodaire

Thank you. I normally associate the ending "í" with pluralisation and got this wrong because of that. Am I incorrect about the significance of that specific ending, or is there some specific reasoning behind this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

While í is one of the many plural endings, and one of the first that learners learn, with words like cailíní and buachaillí, not all words that end with í are plurals (just as not all words that end in "s" in English are plural - "news", "bus", "class", for example).

Some other examples of singular words that end in í are ainmhí - "animal", eolaí - "scientist", lúthchleasaí - "athlete", sochaí - "society".

These singular words that end in í usually get a plural ending of -ithe - geansaithe, ainmhithe, eolaithe, lúthchleasaithe, sochaithe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trodaire

Thank you, yet again!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaireKell881522

Can jumper count too? In ireland we dont call them "sweaters" can u please accomidate everyones terms please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michelleplus8

What does "jersey" mean here? Like a football jersey? I don't think of that as being similar to a sweater at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

This Wikipedia article might help - Jersey/Jumper/Pullover are to some extent used interchangeably in Ireland and Britain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Not like a football jersey, no. Read here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gliddon

In rural Ontario, a Jersey is a breed of cattle, similar to a Guernsey. Both produce absurdly creamy milk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Jersey, jumper and sweater overlap in British English much more than in American English. All three can mean the woollen or artificial fibre garment that Americans would call a sweater. The outlier is jersey, which can mean sweater, but also a sports top for football, soccer or rugby. As I am sure you know, the Jerseys and Guernseys you mentioned are named after (for) the islands of those names in the English Channel. And their milk is delicious.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laoisemch

I think 'jersey' is a geansaí or a geansaí peile


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samterry4

Jumper /jersey same difference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MollyCusta

I've no idea why the two Channel Islands gifted their names to this particular article of clothing, but I always understood as a child that if my mother asked me to pass her gansey I should give her the jersey

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