"Kies panon oni manĝas, ties lingvon oni parolas."

Translation:Whose bread one eats, that person's language one speaks.

3 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ShaneStrin
ShaneStrin
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The meaning is clear, but that is some convoluted English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/traevoli
traevoli
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Yeah, making proverbs sound poignant in another language is tricky business. Given the type of platform that Duolingo is, I'm surprised this was included as an exercise.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hellomidnight

I translated it as "Whose bread you eat, their language you speak" and it was accepted. It's a little easier to say than the literal translation.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CloudeAytr
CloudeAytr
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I can learn languages by eating bread now?
Al la multkultura bakejo mi iru!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CameronAvocado

I don't really get the meaning of this sentence >.<

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tringers
tringers
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I'm not sure if you're still wondering about this seven months later, but I took it to mean: If you are accepting somebody else's hospitality, you should make an effort to use the language and customs that they are comfortable with.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bir_kedi
bir_kedi
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thanks for that!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ccrittenden
ccrittenden
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In every other language I've studied, both here on Duolingo and in a classroom setting, the practice has always been to translate a proverb into a proverb of the same meaning in the target language. For example, in English we have the saying "It costs an arm and a leg" which means it's very expensive. If I were to translate that into Spanish, I would have to say "Cuesta un ojo de la cara" which has the same sense but literally translates as "It costs an eye of the face".

In a similar fashion, this Esperanto proverb should be translated into English as "When in Rome, do as the Romans do".

There is a feature in Duolingo that lets the creators of a language course put proverbs and idiomatic expressions into their own skill category that can be added to one's learning for the mere price of a few lingots. I would suggest doing that for Esperanto as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/donaldo_zouras

That English is tortured. Ironically, I actually understood it in Esperanto and could not think of how Duolingo expected me to translate it into my native English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/morganjunor
morganjunor
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Same here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Corvus_Alatus

It reads like a proverb. There's a number of proverbs relating to sharing food and sharing ideas being related out there in the world; if I were to take anything from it, it's talking about a shared experience and commonality.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jxetkubo
jxetkubo
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Germane: Wes Brot ich ess, des Lied ich sing. (Kies panon mi manĝas, ties kanton mi kantas.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mingan8
Mingan8
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There two closely related Czech proverbs. One is pretty common( and I think it has an English equivalent as well) Kiu volas esti kun lupoj, tiu devas krii kun ili. I feel this is close to this sentence's meaning. But there apparently is another proverb very close to the German one with a slight twist: Kies panon vi manĝas, ties kanton kantu. The meaning is more like "be grateful and shut up" :-).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julesdelama

The Dutch version is almost similar to the esperanto version: Wiens brood men eet, diens woord men spreekt (whose bread one eats, their word one speaks).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidStyIes
DavidStyIesPlus
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I think the closest we have in English is "When in Rome, do as the Romans do".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eric.59
eric.59
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I thought it was speak English or die
;-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulDeNice1
PaulDeNice1
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What a "lumpy" English translation, surely we can have a better translation, than this almost word for word translation!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dudeski123
dudeski123Plus
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Well that sure is a nonsensical phrase...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nickol_02
Nickol_02
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How about this: Whose bread you eat, whose tongue you speak.

3 months ago
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