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  5. "Jeg har hoste og vondt i tun…

"Jeg har hoste og vondt i tungen."

Translation:I have a cough and pain in my tongue.

July 23, 2015

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PotatoSanta

Is this supposed to be translated literally? I have never had a sore tongue


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ravnin

Guess you have never licked a metal pole in the winter : )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dries651175

A cough and pian in the tongue can be signs of:

-Bronchitis -Asthma (child) -Viral pharyngitis -Allergic reaction -Medication reaction or side-effect -Dust exposure -Smoke exposure -Thalassemia -Thermal burn of mouth or tongue -Emphysema -Goiter


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiaaV
  • 1709

Agreed, I'm a native American English speaker and I've never heard of having pain in a tongue, only on one. Though I did come across a recent article describing tongue exercises (apnea related) so I suppose a sore tongue muscle is a possibility.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AleksanderSander

Haven't you ever bitten your tounge accidentally?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian442793

When one says, "I took my hat and my leave", that can be identified as a "rhetorical device" and labelled a "zeugma". Unusual uses of language draw attention, create emphasis, and what's unusual here is the use of the one word in a literal and a metaphorical sense.

I suspect the same thing is going on with "har hoste og vondt". I think one "har" en hoste in a different way from how one "har vondt".

Anyway, so one thing that the sentence teaches is that zeugmas work in Norwegian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giorgio182480

I'm a big fan of zeugmas and applauding you for bringing them up :)

I just realised English with its huge number of phrasal verbs should be perfect for them - "after a heavy night of drinking, I get up late and a headache".

With "get", you could probably create arbitrarily long chains... "When we drink, we get along well together, but the next day up late, a headache and sometimes fired".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian442793

That's brilliant. Have a lingot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JHB109168

Does vond(t) take the neuter form because the gender is indeterminate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dievasvrede

«Jeg har hoste og en vond tunge.» is correct as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrian442793

Yep, it's possible to say "en vond tunge", but it's more common to say "ha vondt i tungen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Norskrussisk

Oh cmon, forgetting "a" is not a sin. I am Russian studying Norwegian through English. Just underline such things as typos unless it is about incorrect articles in Norwegian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mabel544786

Another way to say this is" Jeg hoster og har sår tunge" The doctor is asking what your condition is, and you can answer with that. Legen spør: Nå, min venn, hva feiler det deg i dag? ( Now my friend, what is " wrong" with you today) and you answer: Jeg hoster og har sår tunge ( I am caughing and my tongue is sore.)


[deactivated user]

    Surely a pain 'on' the tongue, if at all; like an ulcer.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CommissarFeesh

    Not if the pain is a muscular ache within the tissue.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diane216052

    Sounds like no one here has ever had thrush!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randy403639

    I'm doing this exercise with those exact symptoms due to my allergies


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bunchybunc

    So, is it 'hoste' as a noun and 'høste' as a verb?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pele_

    No, "hoste" is both the noun and the verb.
    en hoste = a cough
    å hoste = to cough
    We do have the verb å høste (inn), but that means to harvest.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bunchybunc

    Oh, thank you! I get so confused with many Norwegian words that have an 'ø' but that sometimes appear as an 'o'. Are there any tips for this?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pele_

    Not quite sure what you mean by "Norwegian words that have an 'ø' but that sometimes appear as an 'o'"?
    Are you thinking of vowel changing nouns/verbs, like
    bok - bøker
    å gjøre - gjør - gjorde - har gjort
    ?
    In that case, I'm afraid I can't immediately think of any tips apart from "learning the words", which isn't much help.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bunchybunc

    Yes, that's just what I mean! I wondered if the words followed a rule when they use 'o' or 'ø', but from your reply, it seems as if they are always the same, depending on the tense/other grammatical use?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pele_

    The word itself will definitely stay the same, so if you know that the word for books = bøker, you are all set! It's not going to change to "boker" in certain cases.
    As you might know, the "proper" way to spell an ø with an English keyboard, is oe (ae for æ and aa for å), but since a lot of people here (and elsewhere) tend to just spell it using a simple o, it can probably get a bit confusing.
    So sorry if I'm completely misunderstanding what you're asking, as I'm not the best at reading/interpreting comments.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterHeptinstall

    The inference might be on 'my' tongue, but surely the written expression is 'the' tongue.......

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