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  5. "Der Sommer ist vorbei."

"Der Sommer ist vorbei."

Translation:Summer is over.

October 17, 2013

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caesarliiiiiiii

And the winter is coming :-P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RuthmZabala

Vorbei vs. Schluss?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/missla16

During my 10-week summer internship in Germany, where I stayed in the mountains and it sometimes got down to 30 degrees Fahrenheit at night in July, my host mother would say this frequently. "Sehst du? Sommer ist vorbei. Wo ist dein Mantel?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ullek

Would it be possible to say "Summer is gone"???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riqi_Tang

that's exactly what I said, I'll report it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clivew

I am reporting it too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dunk999

That should be fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rickjmill

vorbei vs schluss?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaSsGaz

vorbei = over but it's expected again schluss = ended completely

Check https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/152063?comment_id=9644863


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimmyTosh

As a native speaker of American English, "over" sounds the most natural to me, meaning that it's finished. I would say "gone" for someone or something that disappeared, or that wasn't where it was supposed to be.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stacie982761

It didn´t accept "Summer is extreme" for "Der Sommer ist extrem" but it accepts "Summer is over" for "Der Sommer ist vorbei." I don´t understand when and why it is acceptable to leave out the article in the understanding of the translation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jackk_

Vorbei, has a sense of it will happen again, but it is done for now. For example "Ist dieser Monat vorbei?" Vorbei is used here because there is another month after it or like in this situation, there will be another summer next year. Schluss means it is completly done for. So saying "Der Sommer ist Schluss" would be like saying summer is gone for good, there will never be another one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minervas37

I don't agree with you. I don't know any German who would make such a difference.

"Der Schluss" is is a noun and therefore the sentence structure has to be changed accordingly. There are some German idioms like "Schluss mit lustig!" (meaning the point is reached where it gets serious -> the fun is over.)

There is no distinction whether something is completely done for or will happen again. You'd say "Mein Leben ist vorbei!" (=My life is over.) although you don't believe in reincarnation the like.

The only difference - I know - is that you tend to say "Es reicht." (=It's enough.) or "Schluss mit etwas." if you want to end something yourself. "Vorbei" is used more generally and neutrally.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrauSimpson

I bloody hope not!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susanna35

I would say "past" normally, but I've already been bitten on that word. I think I learned in my German studies that "vorbei" meant past. Besides, all three words - past, over, gone - convey the same meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VickiElberfeld

Duo accepted "past."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hamoodisaddi

Vorbei mein it is something gone fast


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaylorMeye19

I put "the summer is finished" and it said I was wrong but it lists "finished" as a possible translation of "vorbei". Is there some reason that "finished" would not be a correct translation in this instance?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenYoung84

I don't see what this has to do with adverbs..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nrshakya

Could we also say "Der Sommer ist fertig"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/araruney

That would mean 'The summer is ready/done'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

Fertig is ready, it was not prepared to be ready, just finished.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arnodunstatter

Could one say "Der Sommer ist hinter"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReinerSelb

no. hinter (+dat.) is a preposition meaning behind.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gridironstar

The innocence can never last

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