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https://www.duolingo.com/tolgaparlan

What are "Strong Verbs"?

Hoi,

In the present perfect course description it says,

"You then add the prefix ge- in front of it, and after the stem you put either a -t or a -d (for a weak verb) or -en (for a strong verb). "

But it doesn't make any further explanations about strong verbs. I looked up from dutchgrammar but still couldn't figure out how to distinguish between strong and weak verbs. Is this one of those topics which you can't apply a logic and have to memorize? Can someone plz explain :)

Dank je wel!

3 years ago

3 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JaneEmily

On DutchGrammar they do mention strong verbs:

They are unavoidable, unfortunately, those verbs that refuse to abide by the regular rules of conjugation. On the positive side, most Dutch irregular verbs are only irregular in their past and perfect tenses. We also call them 'strong' verbs, as opposed to weak (regular) verbs. The strong verbs must be learned by heart. It does help if you can recognize the conjugation patterns. The patterns are mentioned in the list of strong verbs.

And here is a list of the "weak" or "irregular" verbs in Dutch

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tolgaparlan

Thx!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjd1123
jjd1123
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More generally, in a Germanic language a "strong verb" is a verb which changes its stem vowel in order to mark its past tense. They exist in English as well, e.g. "(to) be" -> "was", "(to) get" -> "got", "(to) read" -> "read", "(to) swim" -> "swam" and so on.

Correspondingly, "weak verbs" mark their past tense according to a more regular pattern, like "(to) mark" -> "marked", "(to) wait" -> "waited" and so on.

3 years ago