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  5. "Søsteren til min ektefelle e…

"Søsteren til min ektefelle er min svigerinne."

Translation:The sister of my spouse is my sister-in-law.

July 24, 2015

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leny.Philippesen

Ekte Felle : Real Trap


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yaguarete.Pl

Uff hard sentence, in Norway You have very elaborate range of concepts relating to family :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xneb

Do you need to be married to call your partner's sister a "svigerinne", or is it like Danish where you can also use it with a long-term partner's sister?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeifEgilRe

Well, many do use sviger-"insert family member", even when not married, some even in a fresh relationship, but it is not correct. It would at the very least be an underlying hint that this is a relationship going for the long run. Some also like to use it to display trust or affection. But it is correvtly used only when married. Also, one often shortens it if it's obvious who you are talking about, just to "svigers".

And if you would like to talk about any member if your spouses family, you just add "svigers". "svigeroldemor", "svigerstefar" "svigertremenning".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.g.doyle

Er konen til broren min også min svigerinne? Because in English, she's also my sister-in-law,


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deyan161

Does 'ektefelle' refer to spouses of either gender?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Yes, it's a gender neutral term.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leshachikha

Do I have to be consistent with where I put the min (before or after the noun)? I wrote down "svigerinnen min" instead of "min svigerinne", which is correct on its own, but I guess because it was already "min ektefelle" (possessive pronoun before the noun) I have to be consistent and put min before instead of after the second noun too? Or is it just because the audio was one way, that the other way was not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeifEgilRe

At least in daily speak and written Norwegian, it is no problem to do it both ways.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/svenska1227

So, I know this is kinda off topic, but I have to questions. 1. Why doesn't Duolingo teach any of the feminine forms? 2. In Oslo, do they say "husene" or "husa" for the definite plural form? Tusen takk!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bunchybunc

Why is the second 'min' required here? In other sentences it is left out, such as in, 'Jeg liker ikke svigermor'.

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