https://www.duolingo.com/tjasonham

Whoah. "behöva" ~ "behoove"

tjasonham
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Just realizing this months into my Swedish tree. Mind blown. That is all.

Have you guys noticed any other common Swedish words that have English cognates that were not so obvious? With "behoove" it's because it's a word I never use.

3 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Snommelp
Snommelp
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Det här and det där line up rather nicely with the colloquialisms from the Southern US, "this here" and "that there." But don't try to translate them that way, I've tried it and it was a poor decision :-P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berniebud
Berniebud
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There used to be a word "Hight" in English, which was a cognate with Swedish "Heta", and was used pretty similarly.

"He hights Johan" - "Han heter Johan"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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On the subject of be-prefixed verbs, there are beseech - besöka, behold - behålla and befall - befalla.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toastie70
toastie70
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Hej!

I'm being struck by these similarities on a regular basis. One similarity which occurred to me early on and once I'd got used to the correct pronunciation was köp and shop.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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You'd think so, right? But they're actually false cognates. "Köp" and "cheap" both derive from the Latin caupo (trader, innkeeper, huckster), but "shop" comes from Proto-Germanic skupp-/skup- (barn, shed) via Middle English shoppe.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toastie70
toastie70
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Well, every day's a school day! Tack så mycket..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tjasonham
tjasonham
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While it's a false cognate, it was still neat to see that Köpenhamn (Copenhagen) just köpen + hamn. Some sort of buying or merchant port/harbour :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toastie70
toastie70
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Indeed. One of the reasons I latched onto this false cognate was that a Swedish friend was explaining that the towns that have -köping in their names are historically market towns (Norrköping, Linköping etc).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snommelp
Snommelp
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One that just occurred to me is the archaic use of "prove" in the saying "the exception that proves the rule." In that saying, "prove" actually means "put to the test," which is exactly what prøve means in Danish and Norwegian and what prova means in Swedish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tjasonham
tjasonham
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This one happens to also be a cognate with Portuguese. I didn't expect my Portuguese to come in handy when grasping Swedish vocab, but it helps here and there, haha.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snommelp
Snommelp
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And I didn't expect my Swedish to help with Portuguese, yet here we are :-P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toastie70
toastie70
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There are lots of languages that use that root in different ways. Correct me if I'm wrong here, but the German Probieren and the Russian пробовать share this root.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toastie70
toastie70
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And speaking of Russo-Swedish cognates... kastrull- кастрюля (saucepan).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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It's from an earlier form of French casserole I believe. That word means a type of stew in English, doesn't it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/airelibre
airelibre
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I didn't know that's what it meant. I always thought it was that the fact there is an exception proves there is a rule in the first place. You learn something new every day, even about your own native language!

Edit: Oh, actually my initial understanding is also correct: "The exception [that] proves the rule" also means that the presence of an exception applying to a specific case establishes ("proves") that a general rule exists. For example, a sign that says "parking prohibited on Sundays" (the exception) "proves" that parking is allowed on the other six days of the week (the rule). A more explicit phrasing might be "the exception that proves the existence of the rule."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/airelibre
airelibre
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bor is related to abode :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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Actually, from what I can tell that's not correct. The root of abode (and abide) is cognate with Latin fidelitas which gives fidelity in English. Swedish bo is ultimately cognate to English be. In essence, they come from separate Germanic (and Indo-European) roots.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/airelibre
airelibre
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Bo is from Proto-Germanic *būaną meaning "dwell", "reside".

This gives rise to buan "to live", "to dwell" in Old English, such as:

He būde on Ēast-Englum: he lived with the East Angles.

An abode is a place which is "bude" in.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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Everything except the last line is correct. Abide is from Proto-Germanic uzbīdaną "to expect, to await" (from uz- + bīdaną, which is separate from būaną). The noun abode, first meaning an extended stay or residence, but later a residence or dwelling, comes from the past tense of abide. Abide/bide is also cognate to Swedish verb bida in the expression "bida sin tid" literally meaning "to bide one's time".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/airelibre
airelibre
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to bide one's time

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toastie70
toastie70
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To bide one's time. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toastie70
toastie70
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Too late! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkBorkBorkBork

I think that's my fascination with languages: see the common roots and origins. Doesn't explain why I have the urge to learn non-PIE language though.

3 years ago
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