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https://www.duolingo.com/lm6480

I finished my tree! C2 Fluency?

lm6480
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After 6 days I finished my tree. I have to admit, I had a huge advantage- a whole bunch of my family speaks Spanish, and I used the placement test. It was extremely easy for me until I had 5 or 6 skills left. I'm definitely gonna redo the end and keep my tree gold. I might do reverse or get to level 25. I probably won't do the Immersion much because I usually do it on my phone. I also have a question. How can I get to be a C2 level in Spanish. If you've done it before, please tell me how you got to that level. I want to have complete mastery, but I don't know how to get there. Thanks y'all!

3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Tamuna10
Tamuna10
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I haven't got to C2 in Spanish, but I'm now somewhere between C1 and C2 in English, so I'll still tell you how I got there :) The things I know, you need to read books, listen to music, watch films in that language, and write down all words and expressions you don't know. You should speak a lot or chat in your target language, and writing in that language is also useful. For me, I've been translating my Georgian books to English, then have spent time editing them, looking up new words, and that's how I got to C1-C2 level :) Maybe if you try translating and writing too you will get there :) Or you can also take courses, that helps too. Briefly, you should practise :) Hope I helped

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nino_dominicano

thanks!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tamuna10
Tamuna10
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You're welcome! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

To get from the Duo tree to C1-2 you'll need to pretty much forget about Duo and move on to more challenging things to develop your vocabulary, conversation, and more complex grammar skills. Exactly what those more challenging things are is pretty much up to you and what is feasible for you. Speaking with family members seems like a huge advantage.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

Read, listen, speak, write. I have lots of opinions on reading development, but all "sides of the castle" are important.

Find books that interest you. I recommend starting with a book that is familiar to you already, to support your comprehension as you build your reading habits and stamina. Aim for middle school or even upper elementary level books, just so you won't be inundated with vocabulary that's totally new. One strategy we teach transitional readers in English: Pick up the book, open to a random page, and skim, counting the number of words you don't recognize. If it's more than 10-20 per page, try a different book. There are also books written specifically for language learners. Check out the foreign language section of your library or bookstore, or check out the Reference section of Amazon (Words, Language and Grammar - Readers). Librarians will also be very helpful.

If it's an option, I also recommend reading ebooks and installing a Spanish dictionary on your ereader: tapping to find a definition is so much easier than stopping to look it up. And you don't have to look up every word, just remember the strategies you learned as a kid: re-read the sentence or the paragraph to get the context, think about similar words (in English and in Spanish) that might have a similar meaning, and just keep reading in hopes that it's either not important or gets explained.

Also read websites (e.g. Noticias Faciles and Buzzfeed EspaƱol). You can even translate the blogs you normally read into Spanish via Lingua.ly and Google Translate. Add some Spanish-speaking accounts on your social media. If you're feeling brave, change the language settings on Facebook, your phone, your computer, or whatever. (Just pay attention, so you know how to change it back!)

If you are planning on using Spanish in a specific context, let that guide your reading a bit so you build some vocabulary. If you're planning on traveling to a certain country, read the news sites from that country, follow some Twitter feeds, etc. If you work in health care, find some medical blogs to read. That way, what you're reading is directly relevant to your interests and experience.

Expect to get exhausted pretty quickly, and remember that it's ok to re-read. I had a particularly hard time adjusting my reading habits: I'm much slower, more literal, and more hesitant in Spanish than I am in English. Give yourself a fresh start as a reader, and good luck!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/levviknight55

Hi! I have done B2 certification in english at my school the last year, so perhaps i can give some advices. if you redo the tree or if you goal the 25 level of course, surely you exercise more your skills in this language. but i think if you want to reach a certification C2 of spanish or just have that level of fluency, Duo in not enough. You had a great advatage for having your family to speak this language so you exercise with them. You had to improve, i believe, because it is required for example during the exam, your ability to speak or to talk about yourself in that language, and not only. Also to listen some audios and answer to questions about it and know some particularities of grammar and expression of the language. So listen some records and prove to write sentences of it or just see videos in spanish or ask someone here native if he can help you. in the end if you want to do the exam of C2 search center in your country which release it and, there, probably they can give more suggestions than i can give you about reaching thal level of language fluency .Bye

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jkrfreak
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I've set up several accounts on Duolingo, so I'm taking the English, Italian and French courses from a native Spanish-speaker perspective. On the English account especially, I use the immersion section and translate from English to Spanish, which has helped me with my writing. Here are a few other websites I would recommend for language learners: Livemocha.com (lessons are easy, but I was able to connect with a partner from Ecuador and we Skype and IM now), Lang-8.com (can post journal entries and native speakers will correct), GoVoluble.com (similar to Lang-8, but you can also record voice messages, and connect with language partners). These sites are all free. Of course online will never be the same as real interaction, so it's great you can talk with your family, and reading newspapers, books, anything in Spanish, listening to the radio, TV, watching movies always helps. Sometimes I talk to myself in Spanish or try to translate movie scripts or articles in my head as I watch/read them. I'm at the same place you are, where I've learned the basics but getting to that next step of fluency is a lot harder. Good luck!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Silent-Hill

Congratulations!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shamrock888
Shamrock888
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Good luck with keeping your tree gold. I finished my Spanish tree in 24 hours using the placement test. I only had five bubbles left to complete after the test. However, all the bubbles almost to the very beginning expired at the same time. There were over thirty of them and I still haven't got them gold again. I don't know how to move up levels once your tree is done. I think it operates on hours spent before it levels you up. I'm starting at the beginning with Italian and it seems to be levelling me up a lot faster than with French or Spanish where I started with the test. I'm thinking of taking the test in English sometime to see if I finish the tree at level 6 or something and then have it tell me that I'm only 40% fluent in English.

3 years ago