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  5. "En skitten hund i et skitten…

"En skitten hund i et skittent hus"

Translation:A dirty dog in a dirty house

July 25, 2015

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kebukebu

Couldn't stop giggling at this one. Giggled so hard that I typed "shirty" before catching myself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hmada993

are you sure it is shirty and not something else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OkLGXM

Time to house train this dog


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KitsuneRin

'skitten' is so much fun to say :P Is this where the word '❤❤❤❤' comes from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScandiShade

I think so... May be one of the many Old Norse words that were brought over to Britain by the Vikings!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jcalla27

Old English and Old Norse were very similar. English is, after all, a Germanic language. The reason why English is so different today is because of the French invasion of England, not the Danish one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cognocto

According to Wiktionary, they both come from the same Indo-European root. Often words that begin with "sh" in English are cognates with Scandinavian words beginning with "sk".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iamCHARM

Who else laughed because they have a skitten mind?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
Mod
  • 2204

Can "En skitten hund" refer to a morally reprehensible person (as "a dirty dog" can in English) as well as an unclean canine? Thanks! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewEat9

That can't be a false cognate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/potatoeglot

Either way, it's a good way to remember what skitten means :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lyaninno

this reminded of the raske meen sketch when calle screamed JEG ER SKITTEN LITEN PIKE i can't stop laughing :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cindsardella

So...a question I hope is bothering more people than just me - can 'dirty' be used in both ways? (Not only in the filthy way?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olayasimioni

Interesting to find out that English bad word isn't that bad after all in its origins :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dzhocef

They only became """bad""" words because of upperclasses saying so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raffie44

Yeah that happened after 1066 when the Normans viewed it that way


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BreechesAud

The English word is a cognate of the Scandinavian word, not a borrowing. It goes back to Old English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raffie44

Ye. Old English is very much like Icelandic which is similar to Old Norse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pdgiddie

Old English is closely related to Frisian, and was a West Germanic language, whereas Old Norse was a North Germanic language. They're all Germanic languages, of course, so they are related, but Old English and Old Norse were technically from different branches. They were just similar enough that the Viking settlers in England could communicate with Old English speakers, but it was different enough to cause confusion with case inflections, and the interaction between & merging together of the two languages ultimately led to the loss of the case and gender systems by the time of Middle English :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy585

Is that a saying? Sounds like it could be.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ravnin

I have not heard it before at least.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuneKommun

A dirty dog in a dirty house it means :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ladygagadisco

What exactly is the difference between "skitten" and "skitne"? I feel like they're different forms of "dirty", but under what circumstance do I use "skitne"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae
Mod
  • 483

"Skitne" is the plural form, it's also the form used with definite singulars IF the adjective is attributively used (= placed before the noun).

"Skitten" is used with m/f indefinite singulars, and m/f definite singulars where the adjective has a predicative placement (= is placed after the noun).

"Skittent" is used with neuter indefinite singulars, and neuter definite singulars where the adjective has a predicative placement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChipAgapi

What about the definite m/f/n form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Birgitte_Nyborg

vikings are pretty easy about their language eh?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aaronheiss

I am impressed at and amused by how much emphasis the audio gives to the adjective here: "En SKITTEN hund i et SKITTENT hus."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/esthof

with a filthy mind


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ctougas01

Omg... I think I lost what was left of my brain with that sentence... I can't stop laughing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaulsonNeoleon1

Is that where '❤❤❤❤' come from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pdgiddie

No, the English word predates the Norse influence, but the two are definitely related, from an older Germanic root.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TornadoOfSouls

En skitten katt i et skittent hus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pdgiddie

Katter er aldri skitne!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack401441

Drives me crazy how Duolingo decides what’s a typo and what’s not! I wrote “i” instead of “in” and it counted as an error FFS


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dimitar92218

A ❤❤❤❤❤❤ dog in a ❤❤❤❤❤❤ house I wrote ''LOL''

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