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https://www.duolingo.com/gabzerbinatoEng

Similarities between Scandinavian languages

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Hallå!
Så, när jag avslutar mitt svenska träd, jag planerar att börjar den norksa kursen. Därför, jag skulle vilja veta om likheterna mellan de Skandinavien språken. Jag vet att danska och norska är mycket lika, och svenska är ganska annorlunda. Men, när jag börjar de andra kurserna, kommer jag ha mindre svårigheter på grund av min svenska kunskap? Om så är fallet, hur mycket mindre svårigheter? Också, om någon har haft samma, hur var det för dig?

Hello!
So, when I finish my Swedish tree, I plan to start the Norwegian course. This way, I would like to know about the similarities between the Scandinavian languages. I know that Dannish and Norwegian are very alike, and Swedish is quite different. But when I start the other courses, will I have less difficulties due to my Swedish knowledge? If so, how much less difficulties? Also, if anyone has done the same, how was it for you?

Tack, gabzerbinatoEng

3 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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I think you'll find that knowing one of the Scandi languages greatly facilitates your learning of a second. There are loads of cognates and most of the basic grammar is the exact same. If we over here can easily learn to understand each other, I'm sure you can too.

What you wrote about similarities is true. It's often said that Norwegians have it the easiest: they can understand Swedish because Swedish has the clearest pronunciation, and then can understand Danish because it's essentially the same language.

Be aware that there are two written versions of Norwegian: bokmål and nynorsk, which translate to "book language" and "new Norwegian", respectively. The latter is an attempt to form a cohesive written language by fusing Norwegian dialects, while the former is essentially a rest from centuries of Danish influence and occupation. Which one to use has been a political issue for well over a century now, but bokmål is clearly more common, and that's the form Duolingo teaches.

I think you'll find for both Norwegian and Danish that, when spoken, they are both a bit harder to understand than Swedish - Danish very much so. We joke about it a lot in Sweden, saying e.g. that it's not a language - it's a throat disease, etc., but in all honesty, Danish has become so garbled in just the last half century that it affects infant language acquisition, and linguists have begun to raise alarms over it. That said, Duolingo tends to use very well-pronounced TTS engines, so it shouldn't be too much of a problem, and if you ever go to Denmark, you're most likely to go to Copenhagen, where they speak far more clearly than in some other parts of the country. (The same goes for Norwegian, too, by the way: countryside Norwegian is really difficult to understand to just about any outsider.)

My advice is to just go for it! You'll definitely enjoy learning either or both of them, and you'll be helped greatly by already knowing some Swedish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabzerbinatoEng
gabzerbinatoEng
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That's interesting, so Danish is becoming hard for children to learn? But something that makes me uncertain is the fact that the TTS engine is sometimes too clear, while native speakers are not always like that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Yes, exactly. Infants have a hard time understanding what exactly their parents are saying. But once they crack the code, they do catch up eventually.

I agre about the TTS, but I figure it's just one of those things you have to go through regardless of what language you're learning. I'm pretty sure my Irish hearing is absolutely atrocious, and I've lived in Ireland. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyttebaer
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Wow, I knew that our pronunciation is "far" away from Norwegian and Swedish (living together with a Swedish guy and a Norwegian girl for the last four months taught me so ;) ) and can be somewhat unclear, but that Danish children have trouble actually acquiring the language is new to me. But very interesting! Did you read it somewhere online? I would love to read about it myself if you know where I could find an article or something.

Thanks in advance. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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No, it came up multiple times during my studies (in phonetics and language/cognition courses, I think). I have also seen it in the Swedish magazine Språk, which when discussing science should be considered a pop-sci magazine but is usually well sourced.

I know that Dorthe Bleses (professor i børnesprog, Odense) has done some research in the area, and she's the one who usually gets quoted by mass media. It should be fairly easy to find some info through googling on Bleses and sprogtilegnelse, but I don't have access to journal databases at the moment so I can't look the actual articles up for you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyttebaer
tyttebaer
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Thank you very much! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tyttebaer
tyttebaer
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Cool! Thanks. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zzzzz...
Zzzzz...
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Hejsan! I wish I was as brave as you when it comes to using Swedish. To answer your question, I would say that Swedish and Norwegian are very similar languages. I have found my knowledge of Swedish very helpful when climbing down the Norwegian tree. As for Danish, the Swedes apparently say it sounds like speaking with a hot potato in your mouth. I would say that I can understand written Danish pretty well, but the pronunciation makes understanding speech difficult. Good luck with your studies!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabzerbinatoEng
gabzerbinatoEng
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Tack så mycket :) Yes, at least Norwegian is understandable to me, but I'm not sure about Danish, as I've never had much contact with the language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snommelp
Snommelp
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Hej! For me, the similarities were both a blessing and a curse. There were very many times when I was introduced to a "new" word in Danish or Norwegian, but already knew what it meant, thanks to Swedish. But when a word is the same in all three languages, it still usually isn't spelled the same, and that's where I sometimes run into trouble. Is it sköldpadda, skildpadde, or skilpadde?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabzerbinatoEng
gabzerbinatoEng
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What about when you are speaking, do you get confused with so many similar vocabulary? That should give me a trouble, because I'm already not too good at spelling :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snommelp
Snommelp
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Oh no, speaking is very nice. I just kind of default to the Norwegian pronunciation and everything is usually fine.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ravnin

The only real difficulty with going between Swedish and Norwegian, is that Swedish use a lot of words for ordinary things that are completely different. And some odd spellings (from a Norwegian perspective).

Danish will take time to get right, because you need to train your ears to listen to all those slightly different pronunciations. Danish is easy to write and read though, harder to speak and listen to.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herr-General

Att svenska skulle vara det "mer annorlunda" språket bland dom skandinaviska, stämmer inte. Rent praktiskt så är det danskan som sticker ut mest. Teoretiskt sätt, så har inga talare av ett skandinaviskt språk, några större svårigheter att förstå det ena över det andra. Alltså, en svensk har exempelvis inte svårare att förstå en bok på danska än norska (och vice versa med dom andra språken). Om en svensk däremot talar med en dansk och en norsk, (eller en norsk som talar med en svensk och en dansk), så kommer svensken förstå mer av norskan än danskan (det samma gäller med svenskan för norsken).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kememmotar

så sent som i slutet av 1200-talet så var svenskan och danskan samma språk... :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herr-General

Hmm...källa? Det låter relativt rimligt, men är skeptisk.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Mina böcker ligger i källaren, men det är rätt vedertagen information, så jag hoppas att Wikipedia går bra. :) Språket/dialekten kallades fornöstnordiska och uppstod när fornnordiskan började splittras.

Se mer här: https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forn%C3%B6stnordiska

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herr-General

Okej! Har aldrig hört talas om det, men om det nu är "vedertagen information" så! :D (Förstår inte varför vi inte lär oss detta i skolan. Jag gjorde det iallafall inte!)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herr-General

Din streak är grymt imponerande förresten! lol.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Tack :) jag är lite förvånad över att det hållit så länge, men nu siktar jag på tusen.

3 years ago