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"Li estas finanta siajn studojn."

Translation:He is finishing his studies.

3 years ago

4 Comments


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chaered
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I am not quite clear about the use of the object case with the adjective forms of verbs. How about these sentences: "La finanta siajn studojn studento devis trinki multan kafon." "La hundo vidas la katon kaptantan muson."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jxetkubo
jxetkubo
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La siajn studojn finanta studento devis trinki multan kafon.

La hundo vidas la katon muson kaptantan. = La hundo vidas la muson kaptantan katon.

Mi skribus: La hundo vidas la katon kapti muson.

3 years ago

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What about "La hundo vidas la akvon trinkintan muson kaptantan katon" -- who drank the water? :-)

About "La hundo vidas la katon kapti muson", I'm not sure what the rule is for telling the subject of the infinitive in a sentence like that: Subject, action-verb, object, infinitive, [ optional object of infinitive ]. In this case the subject of the infinitive is the object of the first verb: the cat. In English, it depends on the verb, compare:

  • John asked Mary to pay him.
  • John threatened Mary to sue her.

In the first, the subject of "to pay" is Mary (the object of "asked"). In the second, the subject of "to sue" is John (the subject of "threaten"). Hence I wonder, is there a general rule in Esperanto for deriving the implicit subject of the infinitive in this construction, or does it depend on the verb?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter293697

He is finishing his studs.

2 years ago