https://www.duolingo.com/josephlewii

English thought processes

Hi Guys

I don't know if anyone else has this problem, but I find when I encounter language in Norwegian I have to process what has been said in English mentally before it comes out in a written mode, but more so when I speak it.

Obviously 'practice makes perfect' is the key here, I'm just wondering how others have made the process of implementing another language more fluid and natural :)

(Really enjoying the course by the way, hope you all are too!)

3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/malkin50

The more time you spend working with and in your new language the easier it will get.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wick_nilson

I have been staying in Oslo for about 2 months and I had brief knowledge of the language before I came here from California, but practice makes perfect. I love this website, and Norwegian is a beautiful language. Jeg elsker dette landet! haha

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josephlewii

I hope you enjoy the rest of your time there!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ravnin

I think it is like that for most people to begin with, it takes time to be able to think and process information in the target language.

I still find myself having to process certain words of English through Norwegian, or the other way around at times. And i've know English pretty much my entire life.

Guess that's what happens once you know more languages, sometimes your brain gets "stuck" on a word, and you need to figure out a way around it in another language you know, or through similar words.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josephlewii

Thanks for the reply, I appreciate it! Would you say the ease of knowing another language comes from excess exposure to it? I'm always looking for tips from people!

Regards :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ravnin

Definitively. I know I learned English by playing games and watching TV as a kid, to begin with I had my mom translate for me if there where no subtitles. I expanded my vocabulary through entertainment, and learned more about grammar and sentence structure in school.

Games, TV and later the Internet where a big part of why I learned English as quickly as I did I feel.

And now that I am re-learning Swedish, I read a lot of news in Swedish. There's a lot of words I have forgotten the meaning of because of lack of exposure, but I will eventually get back to where I was in my early teens.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josephlewii

Thanks for the feedback, I always appreciate it xoxo

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josephlewii

I was wondering, could you direct me some form(s) of Norwegian media? Being English we don't know a great deal about your arts and entertainment :p It's fine if you don't, you're call ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ravnin

I'm not the right person for that I think, I don't pay much attention to Norwegian entertainment etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/comeoutcomeout
comeoutcomeout
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The Duo system isn't ideally designed for getting you out of that type of English/Norwegian back-and-forth thinking, because the course is constantly asking you to translate between the two, all the way to the highest levels of the skill tree. It never has you just engaging solely in the target language, which is arguably the best way to start 'thinking in Norwegian'.

So yeah, greater immersion in Norwegian is really the key, through media etc. The biggest help is to see if you can find a Norwegian-speaking conversation partner local to you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Odin_
_Odin_
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It's not a problem, it's normal, eventually you'll stop doing that. A lot of exposure is probably the key to quit translating everything inside your head. I learned English the same way as Ravnin did and try to do the same with Norwegian. I try to watch, listen and read as much as possible in Norwegian in the hope eventually it comes as naturally to me as English came to me. But for now I also translate everything inside my head from Norwegian to English/Dutch or vice versa.

Not sure if you can try to turn it off, I'm not far enough in my learning to try that, but from my experience with English it will just come naturally. At one point when you're having a conversation in your second language you will also start to think in it. I can think in Dutch and in English, when I talk in Dutch I will also think in Dutch and while I talk English I think in English. Not sure if it even makes sense what I'm saying now, but try if you're able to think in Norwegian already. Try to think about whatever you want to think about but block your own language and do it only in Norwegian. Because if you don't want to translate everything inside your head you have to be able to think in the language.

3 years ago
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