" bhfuair gradam riamh."

Translation:I never got an award.

July 27, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/exeisen

Is "I have never gotten an award" OK?

July 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/obekim

I would say, yes.

I think this is an other case where the Irish simple past, particularly with certain adverbs, could correspond to the English present perfect.. See another discussion on this here.

I also think "I never received,,,", "I have never received..." should be acceptable alternatives.

I have submitted a report on these two points.

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen

So, not only is faigh one of the six irregular verbs, and thus its past negative form begins with instead of níor, but it's also eclipsed instead of lenited. Did I get that right? Does this happen to the other five irregulars as well?

July 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

There's actually 11 irregular verbs, but only 6 use different particles. And no, the others don't eclipse in the past for . faigh might be the most irregular, in my opinion.

July 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling

In total, faigh gets eclipsed after in the indicative past, the future, and the conditional.

July 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JMjoQk

Must "gradam" be "award" or can it be "grade"?

December 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

"Grade" is grád, with a fada. Gradam (no fada) is "Award"

December 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL

"I have never got/received an award." (UK English adds -en to got only when used adjectivally, as in "ill-gotten gains".)

June 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

This is another example of the speaker's consonant lending, which remains a problem for Americans who have little access to Gaeilge in life.

mé gradam turns to még radam in her speech.

March 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1079

See my explanation of why this isn't "consonant lending", and isn't a flaw in this speaker's speech here:
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/6128992$comment_id=26544934

March 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/StanStanDaMan

Thank you. As I pointed out there seem to be a sparsity of native Irish speakers in these parts.

March 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NJI741534

Is I didn't ever get an award different from the canonical answer?

I'm ignorant about verb tenses. Thanks, in advance.

November 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling

Its meaning is the same.

March 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeInCalif

It sounds to me like there is a short sound — one syllable, that sounds like "i" — between "gradam" and "riamh." Does anyone else hear that?

January 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1079

No, she is just saying Ní bhfuair mé gradam, and then saying riamh separately.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeInCalif

Thanks! Listening to the sentence again with your comment in mind, I think I was interpreting the transition between the "m" in gradam and the "r" in riamh as a stray vowel sound...

January 11, 2019
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