"Who drinks from this cup?"

Translation:Qui boit dans cette tasse ?

6 years ago

63 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/johncopter

why is it "dans" and not "de"?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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That's just the way the French say it.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vamagman

Uggh....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Macattaq
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I looked at a list, and boire seems to take dans, with dans meaning from. Do you know more about why this is? I could see a possible explanation coming from the literal translation "to drink in". As in drink in xxx liquid from yyy source, which english would just translate to "drink from". Does this make sense at all or is there a different/more accurate explanation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Prepositions always challenge logic and common sense. I suggest you don't spend time trying to find an explanation.

"dans" means "in" and "from" translates to "de".

Yet "boire dans" translates to "drink from" and vice versa.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bismarck1873

Perhaps this originates from the concept of "drinking from" being very much taking the interior of the object holding the liquid; that is, there's never a situation where you are drinking "from" something that we would not also say that the liquid is "in" (true of cups, bowls, rivers, etc.).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dorrtippens

Appreciated. Also misleading (but still very helpful) is the Google translator which gave "Qui boit de cette coupe." I'm assuming that it should be "dans" here as well? And as for the plethora of responses as to whether a cup is a cup and a glass a glass, I'm 66 and have lived all over the United States and I've never crossed exceptions to where a glass was made out of glass and a cup not.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Yes, "qui boit dans cette coupe ?" is no exception.

By the way, I have at home "glass cups", which are tea cups (ie with a handle) made of glass. Cheers!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dorrtippens

tee hee. Then there's always the "mug" factor.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CR.Olivia

I have a set of clear glass cups

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MamaBear228974

The French are WEIRD!!! And so is their language! Argh!..

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dave746226

I love Sitesurf and I love when he keeps it simple when it is really that simple.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeonGuild

so then it means that the word 'from' also needs to be added to the list of meanings of 'dans' because it is not offered

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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I don't think so.

"dans" does not mean "from".

"dans" means in/inside/within.

"dans" can, and rarely, translate to "from" and vice-versa.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeonGuild

still annoys me that i got my answer wrong because of this rare usage but thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kelic
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I think the distinction between cup and glass is historical and the two are, at times, interchangeable. Personally, I think glass referred to a drinking vessel made from glass but has come to refer more to a size and shape now than material. What is interesting is that cup comes from the Latin cupa and glass from the Germanic glas but in modern German a cup is tasse.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/busywoman10

I am English and I am precise as the French are about the distinction between a cup and a glass. The two are not interchangeable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anneguus

'dans' seems so strange to me. I wrote 'de'. Is that really wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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The logic is that, in French, you drink what is inside the cup.

"Dans" is therefore the only preposition working with "boire" (same for "manger dans une assiette")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/morna_tudor

oh thanks for that. I'm having a lot of trouble with these dans en aux à etc and every bit of understanding really helps until i just associate without having to think (à paris, aux etats unis ...) merci sitesurf tu es une ange

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arikgershon
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That's so strange. "Dans" makes it sound like "who is drinking inside the cup"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GraemeJeal

Do the French generally know this? Certainly Google translate doesn't, as they use "de" rather than "dans".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenHoy1
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I use etymology as a memory aid for things like 'manger dans' & 'boire dans': the preposition 'dans' comes from Latin 'de intus' meaning 'from within'. Il boit quelque chose dans une tasse = he drinks something from within a cup.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SloanePaoPow

why can't I say verre? We don't really make that big a distinction between glass and cup in English. Is it a bigger deal in French?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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We tend to be precise on these matters.

A cup can be a variety of things, like une coupe, un gobelet, une tasse... each with specific characteristics

Un verre is un verre: verre à pied, verre à vin, verre à eau, verre à liqueur, verre à dents...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RabbieY
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really. I have never noticed that after living 70 years in the UK

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SloanePaoPow

I'm American not British, so perhaps the distinction is made more clearly in the UK

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tani17
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I'm American and always understood a cup has a handle and a glass does not

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppy7989

I'm Australian - I think I have the same impression, apart from mug which is a larger cup with a different shape. I also use cup for the plastic/melamine cups for children (with or without handles) and also for disposable, handleless cups seen at fairs or parties etc

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul_W
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and what with it being made of glass and stuff... I can't recall the last time I had a glass of tea.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Have you ever seen people drinking ice tea from a cup?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lmnfootball
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Probably a regional thing. In northeastern US, I've always used cup and glass interchangeably. A mug has a handle.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pietvo
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At this moment I am drinking a cup of tea (actually I am holding the cup in my right hand, while typing with my left hand). But the cup is made of glass, so I also call it a glass of tea. I am not a native English speaker, so I am not sure if this would be considered correct. What do you think?
And in French would you call it une tasse ou un verre ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ewan_clark

Personally, I still think that is a cup of tea. It would be odd to say "a glass of tea" here in Britain.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrandiWL
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I would refer to a cup of tea as a hot tea and a glass of tea of as cold iced tea. (Cajun Country/Louisiana, USA)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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It would be "un verre de thé" if it were ice tea.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/holtdwyer
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Just to add a rule of thumb that might help make the distinction: In general, a "glass" is made of clear glass (a glass of wine, a glass of tea) while a "cup" is not (a cup of coffee, a cup of tea). This distinction relies, of course, on using glasses for the same beverages as the French....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Hmm, we do around here. If it's made of glass (and doesn't have handle), you'd usually never hear it called a cup, or vice versa.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eluzie
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American English does make a distinction between cup and glass. They are separate entities. Where you are from is this not so?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xanderificus
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I think you are mistaken. I will wager that you have never heard someone say "tea glass". It is always a "tea cup". In English, we almost always make a distinction between glass and cup. If nothing else, cups are usually used for hot beverages and have handles; glasses are used for cold beverages and do not have handles.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hyacinth3704
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Canadian here. Although I am not sure I could 100% pinpoint the exact characteristics that define them, cups are definitely cups and glasses are definitely glasses. You can have a plastic glass, or a glass cup, but they are really not interchangeable in my dialect. I guess a glass is a cylinder, almost always taller than it is wide, usually made of glass or a clear material (eg. clear plastic, crystal), used almost exclusively for cold (or room temp) beverages. A glass wouldn't have a handle. Cups tend to be shorter and wider, may have handles (but don't have to), and are usually (but not always) made of a sturdier, non-glass material. Used almost exclusively for warm drinks (with the exception of children's cups). Mugs are cups, but not all cups are mugs. Ain't English grand?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Inguin-freyr
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Why is "Qui est-ce qui boit de cette tasse ?" considered wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"de" is not the correct preposition. We don't drink "from" a cup/glass but "dans".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HoytChildsJr

I am from the south of the USA, and I have never heard 'glass' used to mean 'cup' and vice versa. When one asks for a cup of coffee, does one get a glass of coffee? No, not around here. As to using 'dans' vs 'de', I will accept SS's explanation. I've not found him wrong yet.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MTCarey
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glass and cup do not look the same, but they have the same function - to hold liquid fro drinking. As discussed above ice tea is generally served in a glass whereas hot tea is in a cup. In frence however is in not unusual for hot black coffee to be seved in a glass.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan554280

Maybe imagining that the frenxh are relating here to a cup as a bed could be helpful. Like i sleep in my bed. I drink "in" my cup.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanetBerry2

There is a very old English saying that someone is in his cups after indulging too much ...probably from an old beer tankard

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neoscribe

Really? I don't remember that idiom from my childhood. Oops!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiltonHogo

Why is there an extra qui on "Qui est-ce qui boit dans cette tasse" ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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The first "qui" is the interrogative "who?".

The second "qui" is the relative pronoun "that/who", introducing the next clause:

  • Qui est-ce qui boit ? = lit. Who is it that/who drinks?
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmandaCiar2

I think a cup can mean a glass (like someone else said about plastic cups without handles, disposable cups) and even glass cups. I would say I am drinking a cup/from a cup and it could be a glass. However I don't think I would ever swap cup with glass (glass of coffee, tea)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stablonTO95
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I said ''de''but it is saying ''dans'' though that means in it is wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"From" does not always translate to "de" and "dans" does not always translate to "in".

"From a cup" means and translates to "dans une tasse".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dugan4
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What about: "Qui est ce que boit dans cette tasse"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Either "qui boit ?"

Or: "qui est-ce qui boit ?" (lit. who is it who drinks?): the hyphen is required and the relative pronoun must be "qui" because it is the subject of "boit".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hunter10505

?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adfmsjfaksascnm

Dans should not be correct dans means litterally inside of something. It is not correct

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Prepositions have to be learned as they come, together with the word or phrase they are used. In this case, you cannot directly translate "from" and have to learn that drinking or eating from a container is "dans".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeteFutter

Google Translate gave me 'Qui boit DE cette tasse'. What have you got to say to that, Duolingo?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Duolingo won't say anything to that, but I can tell you that Google Translate is wrong (once again). To drink from a cup/glass is boire dans une tasse/un verre.

If you drink from a bottle: boire à la bouteille

1 year ago
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