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"Is she your mother?"

Translation:Ist sie eure Mutter?

3 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ChakibBenz

When should I use Deine vs Eure ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quis_lib_duo
quis_lib_duo
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deine = informal sing., eure = informal plur.; Ihre = formal sing. / plur.

informal sing.: Ich kenne dich. Das ist deine Mutter.
informal plur.: Ich kenne euch. Das ist eure Mutter.
formal sing./plur.: Ich kenne Sie. Das ist Ihre Mutter.

All three mean in English: I know you. That is your mother.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChakibBenz

Ok now I understand it is easier to remember with the formal/informal difference

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abendbrot
Abendbrot
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"you" stands for "du" and "Sie" and "Sie" and "ihr"

  • you to a child --> du --> deine Mutter
  • you to a woman/man/adult --> Sie --> Ihre Mutter
  • you to women/men/ women and men/adults --> Sie --> Ihre Mutter
  • you all --> ihr --> eure Mutter.
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChakibBenz

So "eure" could also work for plural adults ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Yes, if you would call each of them "du" individually.

(In English terms, roughly: if you are on first-name terms with them.)

For example, your aunt or uncle; maybe your colleagues at work; your friends.

But not your teacher or a shopkeeper, and probably not your boss.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChakibBenz

Ok thanks

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GraemeJeal
GraemeJeal
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Why can't I invert the sentence to "Sie ist ...?, with a question mark to show it is a question?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Because that's not the right word order for a regular question.

Using statement word order with question intonation is possible, as in English, but as in English, results in a marked question of the kind that you use essentially only when you heard something surprising and want to confirm that you heard it correctly -- not when just asking for information.

  • Is she your mother? (normal question asking for information)
  • She's your mother??! (surprise question)
8 months ago