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https://www.duolingo.com/alexlunac

Throw off - Mess up - Blow off

alexlunac
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Hello there! I wanna know how use those verbs, I have a short idea of how use them but I need to figure out the correct form or the most common form to use them. /That French language throw me off it is so confused/ ; /I didn't blow her off, she is so pretty/ ; /You told the teacher that I did it? That's messed up/. thanks I'll give you lingots.

3 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dobie42

Throw me off/throws me off/ threw me off------When something is confusing or unexpected (We never even learned about Rhinos. When I saw it on the test, it totally threw me off!)

Blow her off/blew her off/blows her off ------to reject or go back on a commitment (She was supposed to pick me up, but she blew me off!)

Messed up is pretty self explanatory. You got it!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexlunac
alexlunac
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Thank you, there you go lingots.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beadspitter
  • Throw off: More about a particular thing than something as general as a whole language, and your phrasing is a little wrong. Imagine--

"Hi! What's up?"
"Hola!"
"......what?"
"I said, 'Hola'."
"Ohhhhh, sorry. The Spanish just threw me off for a minute, I wasn't expecting it. Hola!"

  • Blow off: I can't tell from your example if you have it or not: "I wasn't feeling like doing DuoLingo, and I have a Streak Freeze equipped, so I just blew it off and watched TV instead." Or, "That guy came around again, asking me to sign his petition, but I blew him off. He's such a loser."

  • Messed up: A difficult one to define, but I think from your example that you have it. It means...wrong or crazy, possibly (but not necessarily) in a way that the speaker either admires or thinks is funny. Often used with 'so'. "You actually bit her, just because you were pretending you were a vampire? Dude, that is so messed up!" "She wrecked her mom's car on purpose with her little sister riding along, and then she told the police it was because her sister was trying to kill her. That's just messed up." ('So messed up' tends to imply more tolerance of the behavior, 'just messed up' to imply more condemnation. I have no idea why.) This is not too different from "so wrong" and "just wrong". "You convinced your little brother that his candy was poisonous so he should give it all to you? That's so wrong!"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexlunac
alexlunac
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Thank you for your prompt reply and thank you for providing the requested information, I understood completly, In internet there are a lot of explanations but I wanted one from a native speaker, you should see the wrongs results of too many translators that I saw, that freaked me out, and I think that the harder part of English is those phrasal verbs. there you go lingots.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beadspitter

You're welcome! I'm glad it helped.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malkin50

Exactly. If the whole language throws you off you might just say that that language is messed up! Then you might want to blow it off and study something easy like astrophysics!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malkin50

"Messed up" can also be used literally: I made my bed perfectly and the dog messed it up. To mean that the covers were very smooth until the dog wrinkled them.

Structurally, it's cool (to grammar geeks) because "up" can move. You can say: "The dog messed up the covers." and you can also say "The dog messed the covers up."

3 years ago