"Onze auto is gestopt."

Translation:Our car has stopped.

3 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gbrotske
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In the verb conjugator on verbix.com, the participle for stoppen is (hebben) gestopt, but in this example, it's (zijn) gestopt. I have no reason to believe either Verbix or Duolingo is wrong, so which is correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
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You can stop doing something or stop someone from doing something (so, hebben gestopt) or you can be going somewhere (motion involved) and then stop (so, zijn gestopt).

Ik heb hem gestopt.> I've stopped him.

Ik was aan het rennen en dan ben ik gestopt. > I was running and then I stopped.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rocteur
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If onze auto is gestopt is our car has stopped and not our car is stopped, how do you say "Our car is stopped" ?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
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Please, read Wei Da's post and the answers that were given to his questions. Cheers!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wei-Da
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How should I translate "our car has been stopped"? If it is also "onze auto is gestopt", then how to distinguish between the passive tense and the present perfect in Dutch, can someone help me with that?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nielzke23
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You translate it most of the time same, then the context will tell you in which tense it is,''Onze auto is gestopt door de politie.'' (Our car has been stopped by the police.) But another option is to say ''Onze auto is tot stilstand gebracht.'' Which means that the car is brought to a stop (hopefully that is good English :)), but that sounds a bit too polite to my Dutch ears.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wei-Da
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thanks a lot, pal. It's good to hear from a native Dutch that those two translation have the same literal appearance.

I guess there must be some cultural stem that the Dutch people employ the same construction for both passive tense and some present perfect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shore01
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So without the context: ' Onze auto is gestopt.' could also be: 'Our car has been stopped.'? If yes, then this alternative answer should also be acceptable?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
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I see what you mean, but then again, as in this skill we are practising the Voltooide Verleden Tijd (Present Perfect), I don't think it'll be accepted as a correct answer.

On the other hand, as no agent ('doer') has been mentioned ('door de politie', for example), then we cannot be sure whether it's a passive sentence or not... So, it's as if 'by default' one would tend to interpret it as an active sentence in the Present Perfect, and not as a passive sentence. Or at least, that's how I see it.

Hope this helps. Cheers!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TeoNovakov

Onze auto is gestopt (geworden)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
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But that would be a passive sentence, meaning Our car has been stopped, right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mitch571793

Should "our vehicle has stopped" have also been accepted?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
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I don't think so, since 'vehicle' is a much wider term than 'car': a vehicle may be a car, a motorcycle, a bicycle, etc.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robincarri
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I'm still confused. There is another sentence in this section about someone having biked IN Amsterdam. In that case "hebben" is used instead of "zijn" because, as was explained, there was no direction involved. There is no direction in this exercise, either, so why does this one use "zijn"? TIA

1 month ago
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