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  5. "Lui chiese una birra."

"Lui chiese una birra."

Translation:He asked for a beer.

July 29, 2015

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peephole

I wrote "he ordered a beer" and was marked wrong and it corrected to "he ordered 1 beer"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrlukens

Agree, it should be accepted. It is more natural than "he ordered one beer."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JWiecking

Me too. This is ridiculous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathiasBur4

Does the passato remoto even make sense here? This does not seem to be a historic fact or to have happened in the distant past.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RychkovSS

But what if he asked for a beer and the waiter didn't bring it? In terms of service time this could be distant past :) p.s. to be honest for me it doesn't make sense either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johelms

This would be entirely contextual. You might be reading an account of something that happened in the past, for example. In common conversation, though, it would be very strange to hear the passato remoto here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John601897

He requested a beer should be accepted but was marked wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dave-ashby

In fast mode, it sounds like the English 'ch', as in 'cheese'. Is that a regional pronunciation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaNordin

could this also be: He asked him for a beer. ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juraj.slavik

I am not sure (I am not a native IT speaker), but I would say no. For what you want I would use "Lo chiese una bira".

http://dictionary.reverso.net/italian-english/lo%20chiedere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glasir

I am a native, and just as you said. 'Lui chiese una birra' does in no way mean that he is asking for a beer to a guy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sedona2007

I think instead of "Lo chiese una birra" that should be "Gli chiese una birra." with "gli" being the INDIRECT object pronoun for "him".
In your Reverso references, "lo chiese" is being used as "he asked for "it" where "lo" is the direct obect "it". Passato prossimo would be "Gli ha chiesto una birra."

Here are some other examples. https://context.reverso.net/translation/italian-english/gli+chiese


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaNordin

Thank you. I'm sure you are right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelaC488603

It's still marking this translation as wrong and giving ONE beer as the correct answer.

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