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  5. "Itheann na béir sú talún."

"Itheann na béir talún."

Translation:The bears eat a strawberry.

July 29, 2015

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeesKiwi

It must be a pretty big strawberry if multiple bears can eat it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoraCola

or tiny bears!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pol-Cowzer

What's wrong with the bears eat strawberry?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeredithNa

What is the plural for strawberry? What's the grammar rules for nouns that have two words? Do you pluralise both or one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1560

sútha talún

In this case, you don't pluralize talún ("ground berries" or "berries of ground").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeredithNa

How do you pluralise "su"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1560

The masculine noun , meaning "juice" is súnna in the plural.

The feminine noun , meaning "berry" is sútha in the plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WhiskeyFlames

So 'we drink juices' would be 'ólaimid súnna' and 'we eat berries' would be 'ithimid sútha'? If I added 'the' before the juices and berries, 'we eat the berries', it would be 'ithimid na sútha'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1560

Only in theory. In practice, you would use a different word for generic "berries", and just as in English, you would probably stick with the singular su as a mass noun for "juices".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Milnrowmart

Does sú talún also mean ground juice?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Baloug

No, it means "ground berry". "Sú" can also mean "berry" but I don't know if it's used that much anymore, except in expressions like "sú talún" (strawberry) or "sú craobh" (raspberry, literally "branch berry").

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