"This car is only four feet long."

Translation:Níl an carr seo ach ceithre throigh ar fad.

July 29, 2015

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JesusCouto

In another exercise I found "sé troithe". Why is here "ceithre throigh"? Is it not troithe a special plural form for counting?

June 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling

See this discussion for an overview of which forms of troigh go with which numbers.

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JesusCouto

Then, if I understand well, it should be "ceithre troithe" in this exercise. GRMA, Scilling, it is an honour to be adressed by you. You are being of great help to me in the learning of Irish. Beizón! :-)

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling

Yes, you’ve understood well. Whenever you find an exercise with an incorrect translation provided, be sure to use the Report a Problem button to bring it to the attention of the course creators.

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Smith_Bill

I thought carr and gluisteán were both acceptable for car. They were both expected in another question, and yet this one is marked off for my having selected both of them. What have I missed???

July 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

They probably didn't expect ito as an answer

July 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruairi21

The one with gluisteán said, "cuig throigh". The translation asks for four feet, not five feet. I empathize as I was caught by something similar before. So I happened to pick that out this time.

February 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling

I’ve just received Níl an gluaisteán seo ach ceithre ngram ar fad. as one of the choices, so it seems that wrong answers have a randomly generated component in them.

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AnSeabhac

I said "Níl an carr ach ceithre troithe ar a fhad." Admittedly I omitted the 'seo' but it also corrected the other parts of the sentence which differed from the above answer. However, NÓD has "It is six feet long, tá sé sé troithe ar a fhad." (http://www.teanglann.ie/en/eid/feet_long).

August 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

It's a dialect difference - ar fad is the "standard" way of saying "long/in length" (though it is far more commonly used to mean "complete(ly)" or "total(ly)") , the current speaker says ar fhad, and ar a fhad is just a variation (I think it probably means "it is six feet in it's length").

It might have accepted ar a fhad if you hadn't left out the seo, but that probably depends on whether anyone else reported it as an alternative.

August 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL

There seems to be a discussion about cardinal numbers an troigh, with sé troithe appearing along with ceithre throigh. Duo says it should be troithe, Collins Pocket Dictionary says throigh. Are both right?

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1130

It should be troithe. Collins, and the default answer for this exercise, are incorrect, as explained in scilling's link above.

March 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/joegLI

The placement of "ach" in this sentence differs from other exercises- e.g. Nil ach ceithre troithe eatarthu. Is there a rule I've missed?

March 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1130

For a start, there isn't a noun before "only" in "There are only four feet between them", so it's not comparable to this exercise, where "this car" comes before "only" and an carr seo comes before ach.

April 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086

I got this right only because it was multiple choice, otherwise I would have never know to start it with "Nil" . Is this one the same as those sentences we had that were "You are but a boy"...I haven't had one of those sentences in months and can't remember if they started with "Nil" or not.

October 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/patbo

This is basically what happens whenever there is an "only" in the sentence. Irish doesn't have a word for this, so "X does only Y" is expressed as literally "X does not [do anything] but Y"*.

GnaG calls this a semi-negative clause, in case you want to read up on it: http://nualeargais.ie/gnag/satz2.htm#leathdhiultach

October 27, 2016
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