https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeatingUp

Has anyone tried starting with Kindergarten books and working their way up?

Sup guys

I noticed A lot of people Finish the tree and jump right into immersion or a series like Harry Potter. I was just curious if anyone ever tried literally starting off with baby books and working their way up the age group..

I tend to think very linear, so I figured if I got stuck at a certain age group I could just work on those Kinds of books for a while until I was comfortable.

Cheers guys! thanks

July 31, 2015

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erolfson

If anyone wants to try this out I found this page on a duolingo discussion a while back with a whole bunch of children's book PDFs in a bunch of languages. http://www.childrensbooksforever.com/childrenpages/German1.html

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/josewilhelm

Viele danke Freund! I'm going to use it when I complete my german tree. And not only for german, but french and dutch too! Thanks man!

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phb2013

Wonderful site! Thanks for posting it.

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mawaffles

Danke :)

August 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qwertylaal

It is funny how baby books are hard and I have to look up about a word a sentence.

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes! I found the same while looking at children's books.

Kids have a surprisingly large vocabulary -- and much of it is in words you typically don't learn in language courses, such as clothing ("dungarees"), animals ("ladybird"), plants ("dandelion"), and household objects ("doorknob").

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitor.lu

I think you don't need to go to children's books, there are other resources available: http://learnoutlive.com/german-short-stories-beginners/ ;)

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/l.graveyard_yea6

I will check this out dank / danke ( one these work !! . Too happy to bother :) )

August 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/csharpmajor

I would suggest starting at 4th grade or so instead. The language is not that much harder and the stories are much less boring.

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathryn_Hunter

Personally, if I'm going to have to look up words anyway, and I do, then I'd rather read a graphic novel. The pictures give context like in a story book, but the plot is more likely to keep my interest.

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dobie42

I don't. Most of them aren't nearly interesting enough to keep my attention. I'd rather jump right in to something I know I'm going to have to work at.

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jwv

I agree totally. Most children's books aren't written the ways adults speak so I wouldn't want to learn that way. I definitely wouldn't recommend that someone learning English start with Dr Seuss unless you think it would be a good joke to hear them speak that way ;)

August 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/muhaaas

Yes!. Although not kindergarten books. but rather the books you'd be taught in a German course in Germany. I'm currently alternating between three books titled:

1-German Demystified. (not the best you could find)

2-Lagune (series of three books).

3-Wie geht's An Introductory German Course. (thumps up)

I'd recommend you supplement your Duolingo study with any one of the three, especially the third one. The best thing I found about these is how the level is elevated after each lesson and how challenging the chapters get as you progress. + They do cover important subjects which are missing from Duolingo. I believe that if I keep on with my progress with these books. I'd be able to easily read titles like Harry Potter.

hope this helped :D

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lebdref1

Sounds like a fine method indeed. One advantage of children's books is that there can be pictures helping to understand it.

Another way to make it easier to read is to read a book you already read in your native language, or a book of which you have seen the movie. You can then read more complex books (so you get bored less quickly) and compensate things you don't understand with your knowledge of the story.

When I was on holiday I bought some Disney books and really enjoyed reading those - relatively simple, with pictures, and I remembered part of the story from my childhood.

Good luck!

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chaterlaine

Yes, I started practicing Spanish with comic books and German with comics and children's books. Then I went to reading books in Spanish that I had already read in English. (I am not that far into the German course and have just started French. I have also read Harlequin Romances. Even with just two semesters of French years ago I can read them. Grammar is always correct, they are so full of cliches that it is easy to figure them out, and there is not a brain or deep thought in any of them to get in your way of understanding the stories. Tourist brochures are good for beginners. as well. When I visited Wells (UK) last year I got brochures in English, French, German, Spanish, and even Italian which I have never studied. But reading and comparing them I picked up a lot of vocabulary and could pretty much get the gist of everything.

August 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeatingUp

Nice post. Do you still have any link to German comics or children books? cheers

August 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chaterlaine

Sorry, I did that as a teenager when computers where the size of warehouses and owned strictly by private corporations. But the book I read was "Der Kleine Vampir and you could probably still get it. Asterix and Obelix is published in lots of languages. But I learned the most German from reading Wilhelm Busch, who wrote and illustrated hysterically funny stories. Usually the most popular of his stories are "Max Und Moritz" who are the forefathers of "The Katzenjammer Kids" which is one of the earliest American serialized comic strips, and "Die Fromme Helena" about a spoiled brat of a little girl and her self-centered con man cousin. My favorite, however, is The Knopp Trilogy. I bet you can get them all in English and in German. Wikipedia has a great article on him including a few excerpts from his books and some illustrations. The translations aren't that great.

August 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGermanDream

"Sorry, I did that as a teenager when computers were the size of warehouses and owned strictly by private corporations."

Why am I laughing so much at that !

August 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chaterlaine

Not only that, I learned to type on an Underwood-Olivettii-tap tap tap zing, tap tap tap zing, and I can still take Shorthand, even if only at 30 wpm. I was a really hep cat walking to and from school with my transistor radio in my hand and I was the first kid in school to get a reel to reel tape recorder. And most people thought I was totally crazy for reading science fiction. "A man on the moon? Space ships?? Ray guns! You must be out of your mind. It'll never happen." The crazier your dreams, the more likely they are to come true.

August 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.clayton.

there is a dialect called leichtsprache that is easier for foreigners to read. It's a nice way to start immersion. try usind this site. http://www.nachrichtenleicht.de/nachrichten.2005.de.html

August 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chnoxis

This is not only made for foreigners. This is also made for people with learning difficultis or a mental handicap. Some texts from governments are written in "Leichter Sprache". Alternate to the normal text.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leichte_Sprache

And yes. I think this is a good way to start a new language like German. :-)

August 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carolyn250

It is a thought! I actually did do something similar as a librarian in a French immersion school. I would read simple kindergarden books aloud to the children, and it is surprising how much vocabulary I picked up. But one can get bored at that simple level.

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeatingUp

I agree, as I get bored I guess I plan on "moving up a year" lol

Amazon separates books by age so u can start at 1 year olds and go up to adults

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.Storr.

I am learning Swedish and I had the same thoughts a wile ago. I chose to read the first part of Harry Potter and I am really happy with my decision. It is not as if this book were that easy. But I read it at least eight times before, both in German and in English. So I know what is going on and this makes it a lot easier to understand unknown words and phrases. Why don't you give your most favourite book a chance? Or read a book in two languages at the same time - one site or chapter in English and then the same page/chapter in German. This for sure will work as well.

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.clayton.

I have a website for fairy tales that allows you to read both the english and german versions of each story side by side. It also has some other ways to make german easier. check it out: http://germanstories.vcu.edu/grimm/grimm_menu.html

September 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.Storr.

Thank you very much. :-)

September 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maldito23

I did this with Spanish and I plan to do it with German as well. It ruins the pleasure of reading for me if I am consulting the dictionary more than I am reading an actual book, and I found working my way up in reading levels a good way to deal with that. I have also known a few people who have tried to read Harry Potter right out of the gate and stopped learning the language because they got discouraged with their lack of ability to understand something as seemingly simple as Harry Potter. They probably would have found "Why do Dragons Love Tacos" to be challenging as well, but it would have been doable. After awhile they could probably graduate to "Captain Underpants" and then on to a full children's book with no pictures. After spending some time at each reading level a book like Harry Potter might not seem like such a sisyphean task, and their ability to stick with it and learn (while at the same time gaining some enjoyment from their target language) would endure.

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeatingUp

That's exactly the way I feel.. Cheers

August 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lomereiter

I tend to agree with these points against doing so: https://smartergerman.com/dont-read-german-childrens-books/

August 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimmiDee

Like others, I don't recommend it for the reason that children's books are aimed at teaching reading to children and not teaching language to adults so the vocabulary isn't all that suitable. My tactic is to preview books before I buy them and only buy them if I can read the preview without too much difficulty and I find it interesting. I struggled with a few books that I wasn't interested in but finally bought one by my favourite author (one I hadn't read yet) and because I was interested in it and she uses quite simple language I finally finished a book.

August 3, 2015
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